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Archive for April, 2010

After Larry Keel and Natural Bridge‘s set at the French Broad River Festival today, they head off on Saturday, May 1st to Columbia to play the White Mule. Check out this great interview with Larry Keel and the Free Times:

Larry Keel & Natural Bridge
The White Mule: Saturday, May 1

BY KEVIN OLIVER in the Columbia Free Times

For 20 years, Virginian Larry Keel has explored various corners of the bluegrass music world, first with the progressive bluegrass of McGraw Gap, then with the even more adventurous Larry Keel Experience, and currently with the more traditional-based Natural Bridge.

“I just like to play all kinds of music and have fun with it,” Keel says when asked about his various ensembles. “That’s what the crowd wants to see the most, is somebody having fun while they’re playing.”

…   …   …

Though he’s done plenty of different things, Keel wouldn’t have it any other way, he says.

“I love what I’m doing right now with Natural Bridge, playing some wild forms of bluegrass,” Keel says. “I have been doing some playing with Yonder Mountain String Band, and I still get to play with Keller Williams a bunch, too.”

The Williams connection goes back a ways, and Keel, along with his wife Jenny, have a new trio album with Keller Williams coming out in late May.

“It’s all No. 1 hits from the pop charts, done bluegrass style,” Keel says. “It’s fascinating to me because I didn’t know many of the artists we covered when we started recording. We just learned them and put them into a bluegrass format right there.”

The best thing about the new songs so far, he says, has been the crowd reaction at the shows.

“When we’ve played these songs live, the reaction of the kids is that they love it,” Keel says. “It’s not complicated, we just brought out the songs using a bluegrass band as a tool.”

It’s those kids who are the fastest growing part of the bluegrass audience who will appreciate what Keel does the most, but Keel says what he, Williams, and others are doing will bring those new fans into the more traditional side of bluegrass, too.

“I have the theory that all things must change to grow and prosper, and I see that happening a lot with bluegrass,” Keel says. “Yonder Mountain String Band are drawing thousands of people everywhere they go. They taper their set to play songs that the young people know today. If they do it bluegrass style, the kids might know the song but they are listening to it in a bluegrass format, then they play a Bill Monroe right after that and they get them to listen to it, too.”

Other than touring and recording, Keel has another new project he’s put out there; a website called Fishin’ and Pickin’ (fishinandpickin.com), which is exactly what it sounds like — a site for people who like to fish and who also enjoy live music.

“It combines two of my loves: fishin’ and pickin’,” Keel says. “Make sure you don’t put Gs on those words, either. I meet so many wonderful people who are fishermen and pickers, too.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.free-times.com/index.php?cat=11011801074507906&ShowArticle_ID=11023004104307021


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The Beat Magazine in Wilmington did a great interview with Tara Nevin’s from Donna the Buffalo. It is the cover story for the May 2010 issue. This show’s location has been changed and will be held at the Soapbox Laundro Lounge in downtown Wilmington. www.thesoapboxlive.com

DONNA THE BUFFALO
Rolling Thunder
By John Fonvielle The Beat MAgazine

There are different kinds of fame and ways to get it. One kind is achieved through a publicity machine, packaging and selling a talent to the masses. Another means is the talents taking it to the masses themselves, demonstrating directly why they deserve to be on the cultural map. The first is a manufactured product, the second is a more organic, and some might say, honest approach.

As the music business has shifted, because of a shot in the proverbial foot, the prepackaged artist is becoming rarer. Donna the Buffalo is in the enviable position of being a homegrown entity, a group that finds itself outside the coloring lines of the accepted formula, a formula that is now in the past tense.

To better grasp this, let’s crunch some numbers: The Rolling Stones has been touring, roughly, for 45 years, U2 for 35. Donna the Buffalo (DTB) has been touring for 21. While not sharing the god-like fame of the Stones or U2, the band has major street cred, a rabid fan base known as “The Herd,” nine albums and the admiration of their peers. Continuing, as Bob Dylan calls, “the never-ending tour,” DTB will be in Wilmington on May 8 at the Greenfield Amphitheater.

Tera Nevins, one of DTB’s songwriters, vocalists and multi-instrumentalists (guitar, fiddle, washboard, and accordion) comments: “We feel good with what we’ve achieved as a band and organization. We are a grassroots operation, very self-contained, very self-dependent. We have built our deal from the ground up for ourselves – by ourselves. That turns out to be a great thing, especially in this time now with the whole music business environment changing.”

Timing is everything. As stated above, there are different ways to exist in the music world.

TN: “We go through periods of total satisfaction and periods of scratching our heads but, overall, I think I can speak for everyone in saying we feel fortunate for the experiences we’ve had playing music and being on the road. We have a wonderful fan base called The Herd, we’ve gotten to play with and meet wonderful musicians and continue to write and record music. Sure, it’d be nice to make more money and there are things we haven’t done that we’d love to do. It’s not perfect, but we’re not complaining either. We’re pretty grateful.”

Whenever I have heard comments about DTB, it has always been what a great live show they put on. Fronted by Nevins and Jed Puryear, who is the other principle songwriter, they also comprise Vic Stafford on drums, David McCracken on keyboards and Jay Sanders on bass. I asked Nevins about transferring the live experience to the studio.

TN: “The live feel and vibe is a result of a very fluid dynamic happening right before your ears and eyes. So much of the live vibe is a result of the energy exchange between the band and the audience. Being in a sterile, silent sound-proof studio with head phones on is an entirely different experience and brings focus and attention to an aspect of the music that is not necessarily the aspect of the music heralded in the live performance. I am speaking of the technical side of the band’s performance. No note, beat, or tone goes unnoticed in the studio and you can, if not careful, stray in the direction of technical perfection, sometimes sacrificing feeling. It’s awesome when you can achieve both.”

They mix an eclectic oleo of American music from Zydeco to Bluegrass, Rock and Old Time, yet maintain a consistent sound that is unique to their band.

TN: “The variety is not something we set out to do. Yes, we love the different genres. I fell in love with the Zydeco of Southwest Louisiana, bought an accordion and learned to play. We don’t set out to be a Zydeco band in any way, shape or form. We use the accordion in our songs and do perform a few Zydeco dance tunes. Jeb and I play Old Time traditional fiddle music, pre-dating Bluegrass. The fiddle music – without a doubt – led us to where we are now and introduced us to other traditional music, like Bluegrass, Cajun, Zydeco, African, so on and so forth.”

DTB, self-made, self-propelled, years of road under those belts, existing in a solid niche. I wondered what comes next.

TN: “We own our bus, we travel with band and a crew consisting of driver, house and monitor sound men, and a person in charge of merchandise production and sales. We have a manager, booking agent, our own in-house publicist. Our most recent record came out on Sugar Hill Records. Musically, we are enjoying playing together, have had many personnel changes over the years, and have certainly grown and learned a lot with each change. Never thought about exactly where we’d be, really.

“We are very happy and feel very fortunate to have The Herd. They are self-organized, and self-named. You don’t have to be a Herd member to be a fan, certainly. Some members can really get around and follow us to gigs a lot and that’s fun, because they become friends and it’s always great making friends, and the whole deal feels very much like a big family or very groovy community.”

“Let’s see, well, maybe a new bus. New festivals, new songs, new records, new fans, new road stories!”

People doing what they love, and better, sharing that passion to the benefit of the public, is the strongest business formula ever written. Donna the Buffalo is living proof of that. Lucky for them. Lucky for us. Everybody wins!

READ THE FULL ARTICLE AND ALL QUESTIONS HERE: http://www.readthebeatmagazine.com/May%2010-Feature2-Buffalo.htm

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Frank Ruggiero with the Boone Mountain Times posted a second, longer and more in depth article detailing his recent interview with David Gans:

David Gans Playing in the Band

By Frank Ruggiero  in the Boone Mountain Times

The music never stopped for David Gans.

A celebrated radio host by day and singer-songwriter by night, Gans is a storyteller 24/7, a member of the old school who sees music beyond the notes.

“I think music can change the world,” he said. “I came up in that day, and I still believe that. I’m not a heavy-handed political commentator … but one of those people who uses music to inspire people to be healthy and kind.”

As host of radio’s nationally syndicated The Grateful Dead Hour, Gans has delivered inspiration for 25 years. Celebrated as a “singer-songwriter-guitarist-radio producer/host-author-journalist-record producer-photographer,” Gans’ many talents fit together seamlessly.

“I was a musician from the time I was a kid,” said Gans, 56, adding that writing was always a driving force behind the sound.

Though always a writer, time spent in the ’70s as a musician-of-all-trades in San Francisco’s Bay Area led to life-changing opportunities in the writing world, when Gans took jobs for magazines like BAM and Jann Wenner’s Record. “All of which were great ways to find out more about music and meet people in this business,” he said.

This spawned a 10-year tour in the music news industry, an experience that enriched his own perspective of music through myriad interviews with such stalwarts of rock as Tom Petty, Rod Stewart, Pat Benatar, Leo Fender and the Grateful Dead.

This latter encounter prompted an enduring (and career-defining) friendship with America’s preeminent jam band, its all-encompassing approach toward music a perfect fit for Gans’s musical philosophy.
As a fan of the Dead, Gans sought out those stories in particular and, in 1977, scored an interview with rhythm guitarist Bob Weir.

“They recognized that I knew what they were doing and understood, so I made friends with various band members and other members of their team and family,” Gans said. “Just by being a supportive journalist, I was welcomed into their world.”

Gans offered readers a vivid glimpse of this world in 1985, when he and co-author Peter Simon released the book, “Playing in the Band: An Oral and Visual Portrait of the Grateful Dead.”

That spring, Gans promoted his work on a San Francisco radio program, The Deadhead Hour, putting together a set of defining songs to musically illustrate his work, when he realized this was something he really enjoyed. Gans took the helm that year, and The Grateful Dead Hour was born.

“By then, I had sufficiently warm relations with various parts of the Grateful Dead world, that when the opportunity came up to syndicate the show, I took it,” Gans said.

But not without a blessing from the Dead.

“I started getting requests from other stations, asking if they could carry the show, too,” Gans said. “So, I went to my friends in the band and asked, ‘What do you guys think?’ They said, ‘It sounds like a good idea for everybody; just go for it.’

“None of this was by design, intention or even planned – it just happened. I had developed such relationships with these guys that I could get their support when I tried to do something. They trusted me, and (bassist) Phil Lesh made that explicit at one point: ‘You don’t have to call me to ask for permission to do this or that – if it’s worth putting on the air, we trust you.’ And that was a great feeling.”

Broadcasted on at least 82 stations, 75 radio and seven Internet-based, The Grateful Dead Hour features music from and inspired by the Dead, woven together with Gans’s firsthand stories from the Golden Road and interviews with musicians and other Grateful Dead luminaries.

And when it comes to the Dead, there’s never a shortage of music.

“I’ve been doing radio for the Grateful Dead for 25 years, and there’s never been a single moment in that whole time where I didn’t have a wealth of material to choose from … It’s a completely well-stocked pantry of great music – delicious and largely nutritious, too.”

And for Gans, music is a key ingredient and part of this complete breakfast.

“Music is my life, man,” he said, citing a talent that flourished from age 6 with the clarinet to guitar at 15 and beyond. “I guess I have some natural affinity for music, a good ear for learning melodies, picking up chords … I’ve always been driven to express myself that way.”

Gans came of age in the time of singer-songwriters, visiting music halls in San Jose, Calif., to sing the likes of John Denver, Cat Stevens, Jackson Browne and John Prine.

Growing up with songbooks from The Beatles’ “White Album” and Crosby, Stills and Nash’s self-titled album, Gans aimed to master the singer-songwriter dynamic. But in college, his roommate and songwriting partner introduced him to the Grateful Dead, “and that completely blew my world wide open,” Gans said. “But the thing that grabbed me (about the Dead) was the songwriting, a great catalogue of American music those guys put out.”

He calls it a musical university, one in which a student could spend the rest of his life exploring.
“But also bear in mind, I’ve been writing songs since I was 16,” he said. “So, I’ve never completely surrendered myself to being a fan of something else. Even though I’d been earning my living putting Grateful Dead music on the radio for 25 years, it was never more important than pursuing my own songwriting.”

In 1997, he released Home by Morning, a duet album featuring Gans and singer-songwriter Eric Rawlins, which was followed the next year by the well-timed single, “Monica Lewinsky,” by David Gans and the Broken Angels.

Five solo albums would follow, but Gans relishes his live performances the most, particularly the degree of spontaneity involved. At a Bears Picnic Festival in Pennsylvania, Gans wound up sitting in with just about every band there. “It was fun, and it’s nice being that kind of musician who people welcome into their sets as guests, which means I can pick up guests to play with, as well.”

One such guest was Phil Lesh, and Gans is considered responsible for rousing the world-renowned bassist from retirement.

“He had not played much … since Jerry (Garcia) had passed (in 1995),” Gans said. “I was working on a benefit … in the Bay Area, putting together a Grateful Dead jam for this event, and asked if he’d come and sit in.”

Lesh agreed, and the September 1997 show promptly sold out. David Gans and Broken Angels with Special Guest Phil Lesh played a couple more benefits, this time for Lesh’s Unbroken Chain Foundation, featuring a group of musicians unique to each performance.

“He liked the idea of a rotating cast of musicians, so he started doing the same thing under Phil Lesh and Friends,” Gans said. “He saw something he liked, then went and did it himself with some world-class collaborators.”

“World-class” is a fitting term for Gans’ own collaborators, including the New Riders of the Purple Sage, the late Vassar Clements, The String Cheese Incident and Peter Rowan. Gans recently joined Rowan’s younger brothers, Chris and Lorin, in Rubber Souldiers, a jam tribute to The Beatles.

“It’s a labor of love,” he said. “We call it a Beatles jam band, taking their songs and kind of stretching them out, because here’s the thing – The Beatles wrote some amazing songs with amazing melodies, chord changes and kick-ass grooves, and then they quit after three minutes. Come on, man, take that song and stretch it out and let people dance a while.”

But Gans’s solo shows promise dancing aplenty. Using a looping device, he’s able to accompany himself, as it were, by building simultaneous layers of guitar work. “It’s a way of allowing myself to improvise with myself,” he said.

Having originally intended the loop to serve as a rhythm guitarist, allowing him to experiment and improvise on lead, Gans realized its full potential.

“Take ‘Cassidy’s Cat,’ a whole bunch of themes from Grateful Dead songs I intertwine, put together in a fresh way,” he said.

His repertoire includes beaucoups of looping figures of his own device, though Gans also performs what he calls “the straightforward stuff,” having generated 40 years’ of songwriting material.

“I play a fresh set list every time, working from my own repertoire of original material and covers from others,” he said. “It’s a real-time performance, interacting with the audience, what feels right, what seems to get their attention. In other words, I’m doing it live like the Grateful Dead taught me, and telling stories, too.”

Gans’ own story continues, naturally, through song. He’s releasing a new single, “Life is a Jam,” this spring, soon to be available for download at www.dgans.com. His last full album was 2008’s The Ones That Look the Weirdest Taste the Best, but for now, he plans to make music single-mindedly.

“It’ll be interesting to try doing things one song at a time for a while,” he said. “We’re at a moment in the history of music when all the old institutions are falling apart, so we have to find new ways to do things.

“Rejoice, rejoice; we have no choice, but to carry on.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www2.mountaintimes.com/entertainment_focus/David_Gans_Playing_in_the_Band_id_001237

By: Frank Ruggiero
Published: 8:38 AM, 04/29/2010 Last updated: 9:45 AM, 04/29/2010

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So far the shows with David Gans and friends in North Carolina Have been fantastic!  Eric Crews, a reporter form the High Country times in Boone, came out to the Tuesday night show at the Rocket Club in Asheville after doing a phone interview with David early in the day. He shot some great video footage and posted a wonderful article:

David Gans & Friends Bring Psychedelic-Americana Sound to ReelHouse Friday

Creator of The Grateful Dead Hour Talks About His Music, Travels

Story by Eric Crews

APRIL 29, 2010  High Country Press

David Gans, the musical impresario behind The Grateful Dead Hour, a weekly radio show that covers all-things Grateful Dead, was driving north on Interstate 26 through the rolling hills of South Carolina en route to Asheville to play a gig when his phone rang. A reporter on the other end of the line wanted to know what the musician thought of the town of Boone during his last stop there seven years ago for a gig at a place Gans can’t remember the name of.

“When you’re on tour,” Gans explained, “you’re not really in a town, you’re kind of in a space capsule. Because, usually, you get there and you do the sound check and maybe you go the motel and then you go back and you do the gig and you get up the next morning and you go to the next gig. So a lot of times you go through places but you don’t really see them. I can tell you more about what I’ve seen on the highway than what I’ve seen in the towns in most cases.”

It is on the highway, in the midst of America and all the little nuances of everyday life on the road, that Gans finds his inspiration. Passing through small towns and stopping off in big cities, playing music with friends, meeting new people—all of these little things add up for Gans, and in the end, provide him with the incentive he needs to leave his home behind and strike out on tour for awhile.

“Being a musician is a terrible, terrible way to make a living,” he said. “Because it’s just really hard to make any money at it, but it’s a wonderful way to see the world,” Gans said, as the sound of the South Carolina wind blew through the car’s open window as he drove. “I’m driving right now in a rented car and, for me, the drives between stops on the tour are the chance to look at the planet and to check out the trees and the rocks. It’s a wonderful thing to be out in this beautiful country making music. It’s a glorious thing, really.”

When Gans is out on the road, traveling from town to town, he can’t help but to think back to the early years of the Grateful Dead and how it all got started for them.

“Jerry Garcia used to drive around the country listening to bluegrass music when he was a kid,” Gans said. “And then the Dead created this scene where young people would follow them around having adventures. Jerry said once, ‘Grateful Dead is one of the last great American adventures. It’s akin to running off joining the circus.’ So I love the festival circuit this time of year. You get to see a lot of the same people, and hear a lot of great music, and in between you get to connect with a lot of wonderful people.”

Back at home in California, when he isn’t on tour, Gans finds endless enjoyment in the simple things in his life like shopping at the Farmer’s Market with his wife, preparing home-cooked meals, and lounging with his two cats at their home near Oakland. “I feel incredibly fortunate that I’m able to have these great adventures out here in America and then go home to a life that I’m so happy with, too.”

While at home in Oakland, Gans is the host of a widely syndicated radio show, The Grateful Dead Hour. The show has aired more than 1,100 times, and over the many years has chronicled many of the incredible live performances by the Grateful Dead that have made them into the iconic symbol of the American touring band. Gans got his start with the Grateful Dead as a reporter assigned to cover the blossoming music scene of the late 1970s, and, according to Gans, the Grateful Dead was always his favorite band to cover. He first saw the Dead in 1972. “They really changed my understanding of songwriting and what music was all about,” Gans said. “I really learned a lot from the Grateful Dead.”

Part of what he picked up as a musician from the Grateful Dead was the importance of songwriting and song styling—learning quickly how merging the lyrics with the music could create synergy within the song.

“I grew up in an age when we all listened to the Beatles and thought we could change the world with songs. And I’m still trying to do that. I try to write songs about the real world that encourage people to look at the bright side,” Gans said. “Ultimately, I’m just a lover of great American music and I’m just trying to make a little of my own.”

Gans will be joined on stage this tour by a few of his friends, including Jay Saunders of Acoustic Syndicate on bass, Bobby Miller, a mandolin picker with a penchant for fast runs and Grateful Dawg-style strumming, and Mike Rhodes of the Blue Rags on drums. At a recent show in Asheville the group jammed their way through a bevy of classic American rock songs by artists such as Little Feat, Dire Straits and the Grateful Dead while getting down to a few of Gans’ originals. This combination of older classics merged with new originality is certain to hit a positive note with fans of eclectic Americana music.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.highcountrypress.com/weekly/2010/04-29-10/david-gans-and-friends.htm

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The Mountain Times in Boone release this great article from an interview with David Gans for his upcoming show in Boone, NC at the Reel House  Cinema on Friday, April 30th:

David Gans & Friends play the ReelHouse April 30

By Frank Ruggiero

David Gans has had a long career as a media multi-hyphenate: singer-songwriter-guitarist-radio producer/host-author-journalist-record producer-photographer. That he can juggle so many balls in the air is nothing short of astonishing; that he does it with such skill, passion, assurance, wit and grace is even more remarkable.

Known far and wide as the light behind the widely syndicated Grateful Dead Hour radio program, several books on the Dead and a number of intriguing CDs relating to the band and its music, Gans has in recent years developed a solid following nationwide for his compelling songs and music. In fact, despite the economic downturn, David says he’s had his best year ever out on the road.
“I’m having great gigs,” he said. “Creatively, I’m as satisfied as I can be. I’m in complete control of my own musical destiny and I’m doing it on my own terms. I don’t have any executives telling me they ‘don’t hear a single.’ I’m not at anybody’s mercy.”

Gans hopes to add another great gig to the list when he performs at the ReelHouse Cinema and Draft in Boone on Friday, April 30. He’ll be joined by friends and fellow musicians Jay Sanders on bass (Acoustic Syndicate),  and Bobby Miller on mandolin (The Virginia Dare Devils), and other special guests.

Besides playing in all sorts of bands through the years—from the fondly remembered Reptiles to the Honky Tonk Hippies, to his recent forays jamming on Beatles songs with Chris and Lorin Rowan (and friends) in a group called Rubber Souldiers— Gans also sat in with an amazing range of fine musicians, such as Phil Lesh, Donna the Buffalo, Henry Kaiser, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Ollabelle, the late great Vassar Clements, Jim Lauderdale, The String Cheese Incident, Peter Rowan, and moe., to name just a few.

He has also written songs with a host of others, including Jim Page, Lorin Rowan, and Robert Hunter. And his live repertoire is peppered with an incredibly broad (and unpredictable) range of cover tunes by old and new musical heroes.


But he’ll also tell you that in recent years, as he’s toured extensively and played with so many superb musicians at festivals and in other settings, he’s discovered a whole new generation of songwriters and players who are inspiring him.

As both a player and a fan, he understands the indefinable transformative power of music—how it feeds our very life-force, bonds us together in obvious and unseen ways, teaches us, heals us, makes us better citizens of this fragile planet.

As David notes, “I came up in the time when we thought music could change world, and I still think it can—the only way the world can be changed: one person, one soul at a time.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www2.mountaintimes.com/entertainment_focus/David_Gans_%26_Friends_play_the_ReelHouse_April_30_id_001216

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This post by Jason Sanford with the AVL Citizen Times and Ashvegas Blog rocks! I was actually an “extra” in this Tea Party moment…

ASHVEGAS: Local tea party is not Mad Tea Party

Jason Sandford • April 23, 2010 Asheville Citizen Times

The Asheville Tea Party is a grassroots movement of regular people on a mission to take back their government. Call them citizen crusaders. They’re mad as hell, and they’re not gonna take it.

But don’t call them The Mad Tea Party. That would be the name of Ami Worthen and Jason Krekel’s popular Asheville band. They’re known for their ukulele-powered rockabilly.

The musicians have been on the local scene a good bit longer than the folks with the political agenda. Yet it seems that some folks are getting the two mixed up.

“We started getting e-mails from people thinking we were affiliated with the movement” when it first took off last year, Worthen says. It’s not the first time the band has had its name confused. There’s a Disneyland ride by the same name. It features a giant tea cup that spins riders around in dizzying style. “What can you do but laugh?”

So the band decided to have a little fun. During the Asheville Tea Party’s protest on Tax Day last week, Worthen and Krekel showed up with their instruments, a cameraman and a few extras, including a dancer in a bunny costume. It was a classic Asheville “when worlds collide” moment.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20100423/NEWS/304230031 THERE IS ALSO A GREAT VIDEO POSTED: http://www.citizen-times.com/section/videonetwork?bctid=78372290001

Photo by Aja Bach

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So excited about All Go West tomorrow 4-24 in West Asheville!

We got a great mention on CNN news today in an article about Asheville surrounding Obama’s vacation:

Asheville offers Obamas food, folk, fun

By Jim Kavanagh, CNN
April 22, 2010 9:18 a.m. EDT

Read it here: http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/04/22/asheville.attractions/index.html

The Asheville Citizen Times  did a nice writeup of the festival:

Go West … Asheville, that is: Haywood Road district gets its own festival on Saturday

Carol MotsingerCMotsinger@CITIZEN-TIMES.com • published April 23, 2010 12:15 am

WEST ASHEVILLE – Long gone are the days when West Asheville was written off by residents as “Worst Asheville.” That frontier off Haywood Road has been settled by artists and entrepreneurs, hipsters and hippies.

This transformation into a bustling creative neighborhood is what the All Go West festival is celebrating from noon-10 p.m. Saturday.

…“It’s a benefit for the area,” said Jimmy Hunt, All Go West festival co-director and West Asheville resident. “West Asheville is very cool, it needs attention economically and some people aren’t really as familiar as they should be with the area.”

Performers include Stephaniesid, Do It To Julia, Brushfire Stankgrass, The If You Wannas and Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band.

Derrick Johnson, a trombone player with Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, views West Asheville as an area that projects “more the true spirit of Asheville.”

“West Asheville definitely keeps it weird,” Johnson said. “It’s kind of like the hipster area. There are neat little bars; everybody is really chill.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20100423/ENT/304230007/1005/ENT

I posted previously about the Mountain Xpress Article about All Go West, but if you missed it you can find it here:

http://www.mountainx.com/ae/2007/042110lets_all_go_west/

Michael Muller (@michaelfmuller on twitter) posted this blog about the festival as well:

http://www.mountainx.com/blogwire/2010/all_go_west_festival_this_weekend/

Thanks Michael for the compliment on the website, “very cool and well-designed website”; we appreciate it!

Jay Sanders built the site:  http://mindtonic.net (@mindtonic )

Jenny Greer did all the graphic design:  http://soundssmindmedia.net (@Jenandthejuice )

Also a big Thank You to Ashvegas Jason Sandford for his posts abut ALL Go West: here, here, and here.

If you have not seen the great video by AskAsheville Check it out:

HUGE thanks to all of the radio stations that sponsored,interviewed, and/ or reported info:

98.1 the River, 880 the Revolution, Main. Fm, Asheville.Fm

Also thanks to all the tweeters, facebookers, bands, sponsors and other people that are helping to make this event a success!


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