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Archive for May, 2010

For more info visit: https://dreamspider.wordpress.com/2010/05/18/funk-and-world-beats-at-the-lab-for-the-world-cup-kickoff-on-saturday-june-12th/

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Dehlia Low performs tonight Friday, May 28th, at the Grey Eagle in Asheville.  The Asheville citizen times did this great  interview with them:

Back after 8 months, Asheville’s Dehlia Low hit a musical high

Carol Rifkin • published May 28, 2010 12:15 am CMRifkin@gmail.com

Asheville Citizen Times www.citizen-times.com

ASHEVILLE – In just three years, the Asheville-based Dehlia Low band has made a big footprint in the regional music scene and is now stepping up to national recognition, playing major events like MerleFest and the Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival.

While the group grew out of bluegrass, their sound has a more Americana and early country feel and doesn’t include a banjo. With Aaron Ballance on dobro and pedal steel, Bryan Clendenin on mandolin, Stacy Claude on guitar, Anya Hinkle on fiddle and Greg Stiglets on upright bass, their original songwriting and strong female lead vocals stand out in concert.

Claude spoke recently about the band and its upcoming concert at The Grey Eagle.

Question: Dehlia Low is so quintessentially Asheville. What brought you here?

Answer: All five of us moved to Asheville specifically for the music scene. None of us knew each other before we came here. All of us were at different points in our lives musically, with different accomplishments, and we all met through the already thriving bluegrass jam scene. We developed friendships and music, and decided to come together musically as a band, too.

Q: Tell me about your recordings.

A: Our first recording project was a live EP recorded in Lenoir. Our most recent CD, “Tellico,” was recorded here in Asheville with Jon Stickley as producer; he is known for his work with the Shannon Whitworth Band.

We have enough material for our next full-length album; we are about two songs away from having it all written. We are getting ready to assemble a team and approach it more strategically.

We had management for a while and went back independent, but now we are so busy that we are ready to assemble a team of outside help because the business side is starting to interfere with the creative side.

Q: What are some important accomplishments?

A: One of the big reasons we got a lot of name recognition quicker was the tremendous airtime and support we got through WNCW-FM (radio) and the news media. We are so lucky that the listeners really liked us and supported us on radio.

Anya and I have really worked hard on the business side and have worked hard to get our name out and get us recognized. We are just trying to introduce ourselves and are so humbled that people like our music so much.

Q: You are playing some big gigs.

A: Our most exciting so far this year was MerleFest. We were thrilled to be included in such a wonderful festival with such great bands. It was great opportunity and exposure.

Gettysburg was incredible, too; we were humbled and honored to be included in the lineup along with Alison Krauss. Because of that exposure, we just got string endorsement from D’Addario strings and a tuner endorsement for Intellitouch tuners. We are so excited to have some of this fall into place.

Q: Do you still have day jobs?

A: Sort of (laughter). Three of us have minimal jobs. Bryan is still teaching full-time. I am basically managing the group right now.

Q: Talk about the instrumentation.

A: Greg Stiglets on bass is one of our principal songwriters. Anya Hinkle on fiddle and vocals is the other principal writer. Aaron Balance on dobro writes; I play guitar and sing; Bryan Clendenin plays mandolin and writes. We all learned to play our instruments in the bluegrass tradition with a little fallover into folk, but that is where we honed our craft.

Anya had a strong background in ballad singing; we are both drawn to bluegrass singing. Our songwriting is really leaning to an Americana and roots country feel. Bluegrass people still like it, but it allows us to dwell in both arenas. That is right where we want to be.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20100528/ENT/305280008/1007/COLUMNISTS

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Dehlia Low is very happy to announce official endorsement of D’Addario Strings and Intellitouch Tuners. There are few things more important to musicians than the tools they use while performing.

“There are hundreds of brands to choose from for everything from your instruments, to picks, to microphones, to strings, to the boots you wear! Between the 5 of us, we’ve tried just about every brand of strings and tuners, and we’re proud to say that D’Addario and Intellitouch are our choice for reliability, accuracy, and endurance. We’re grateful for the opportunity to endorse quality products that we’ve used for years, and are happy the two companies have faith in our music and the future momentum of the band.”

The Mountain Xpress writes, ” In three short years, bluegrass act Dehlia Low has gone from a relatively unknown local quintet playing holes in walls (and the Xpress acoustic stage at Bele Chere!) to a slot at MerleFest and sponsorships from D’Addario Stings and Intellitouch Tuners. In the group’s April ‘Low-Down‘ newsletter they wrote, ‘Our live recording is almost complete… well maybe half way… we hope to have it out by the end of May, we’ll keep you posted! We also just got the final cut of our DVD from our ‘Jammin at Hippie Jacks’ performance last May, soon to be released on PBS.’ Add to that a recent tour with The Shannon Whitworth Band and a steady roster of show dates — including the Grey Eagle on Friday, May 28. 9 p.m. $8 in advance / $10 day of show.



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Galen Kipar Project’s new album the Scenic Route is set for Asheville release on Saturday May 29th at the Lexington Ave Brewery. The show starts at 9pm.

“Each song on Routes is carefully orchestrated and worked with the tender care of a master painter at his easel. Kipar elevates this eight-song collection far beyond standard singer/songwriter fare, wringing emotion and texture from each song and adding layers of interest with rich, resonant percussion and an intricate dance of string tones, states Mtn Xpress writer Alli Marshall.  Click here to read the album review.

Check out this great interview in this week’s Mountain Xpress:

Taking the Scenic Route

Galen Kipar Project returns with a fluid, effortless new album

by Dane Smith in Vol. 16 / Iss. 44 on 05/26/2010 rocknrolldane@gmail.com

Mountain Xpress www.mountainx.com

The aptly titled fourth effort from Asheville’s symphonic-folk outfit The Galen Kipar Project is loaded with images of mountains, rivers, forests and streams, and backed by lush arrangements, fluid vocals and Appalachian instrumentation that bring to life what is essentially a musical portrait of Western North Carolina.

And that, says Kipar, is no accident. The album’s title is not only a literal reference to the years the band has spent on the road, but also a reflection on the way they’ve approached their career.

Water signs: The album has a theme of water and currents that Kipar says was unintentional, but not surprising.

“We feel like we’ve taken the scenic route as a band,” he explains. “We’ve been playing for a while, and we’re still trucking along. And Western North Carolina is such a beautiful area. We couldn’t ask for a better place to drive around and play music, where 75 percent of your job is driving. It definitely reflects on this area.”

What was less intentional, he admits with a laugh, is the album’s underlying theme of water and currents. Nearly every track on The Scenic Route mentions, whether in passing or in the song title itself, to some form of water. But Kipar insists that the repeated imagery was pure coincidence, or at least “subconscious regurgitation.”

“It kind of was by accident,” Kipar says in a way that suggests he expected this to come up. “I really didn’t recognize it at first, and then someone said, ‘Hey, there’s a lot of references to water on this album.’ Then it became apparent. But for me personally, I am a water person. I’ve spent a lot of time near and on the water and I love it. There is a lot of inspiration that comes from water and currents and just being in that environment.

“I tried to come up with an album title that captured the parallels between music and the currents that you might find in water, or in moving water. But I didn’t nail it on the head. They always come after the fact.”

Nevertheless, the eight-song offering is, from start to finish, relaxed, easy, accessible and relatable, yet layered and dense at the same time. Kipar’s vocal delivery is bouncy but gentle, and his harmonica provides a down-home grittiness that balances the atmosphere of strings and flute, which is really the key to Kipar’s appeal. Somehow, he manages to convey the simplicity of folk through the complexities of jazz and classical arrangements, without losing sight of the message.

For his part, Kipar offers a simpler explanation.

“Often it starts out as a whistle, honestly,” he says. “Once you find that melody, those few couple of notes that really define the song, you can start to develop the other parts based on that original melody. Really, all I’m trying to do is develop that original melody and vary it —cover that entire territory, basically.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.mountainx.com/ae/2010/052610taking_the_scenic_route

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Today, Keller Williams releases his first-ever all-covers collection, amusingly titled Thief. Recorded with the Keels—husband and wife duo Larry and Jenny KeelThief includes songs originally written and recorded by as wildly diverse an assemblage as anyone’s ever likely to dream up.

Thief offers up Keller-versions of songs by an [almost] unthinkable collection of artists: from Amy Winehouse (“Rehab”) to the Grateful Dead (“Mountains of the Moon”), the Butthole Surfers (“Pepper”) to Kris Kristofferson (“Don’t Cuss That Fiddle,” which opens the album, and “The Year 2003 Minus 25,” which closes the album). The set is filled out with tunes by Ryan Adams, the Presidents of the United States of America, the Raconteurs, Patterson Hood, Danny Barnes, Cracker, the Yonder Mountain String Band and Marcy Playground. All over the place, indeed, but that’s the way Williams likes it. And in his hands it all makes sense—like everything he’s ever touched, whether from his own pen or someone else’s, it all becomes Keller Williams’ music.

Those who purchase Keller’s new album, Thief, at Keller’s Official Merch Store by August 31, 2010, will be automatically entered into The “Keller and The Keels On Your Couch” sweepstakes.  The contest offers a chance to win a 90 minute private acoustic performance by Keller and The Keels in the winner’s living room for them and up to 49 of their friends.

Keller is on tour this summer – at solo shows, with The Keels, and even for a run of gigs as vocalist/guitarist in The Rhythm Devils, the project by Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann and his partner percussionist Mickey Hart.

Thief at KW Store: http://kellerwilliams.shop.musictoday.com/Dept.aspx?cp=34597_34942

Thief on iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/thief/id365592088


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Mad Tea Party ~ Ami Worthen & Jason Krekel

Kentucky run May 27-29, 2010

WFPK  Studio Session at 4pm on Thurs, May 27th , Louisville

Cosmic Charlie’s on Thurs, May 27th, Lexington

Kentucky Coffeetree Café on Fri, May 28th, Frankfort

Vernon Club:  Bobby Watson’s annual “Dance or Die” Party on Saturday, May 29th in Louisville opening for the Tim Krekel Orchestra. Jason Krekel will also be performing with the TKO.


Photo by Lydia See

Mad Tea Party brews up rock ‘n’ roll, garage-pop and honky tonk to create a fresh and intoxicating sound. “It’s B-52s meets Buddy Holly with a lot more thump.” Musical conspirators Ami Worthen and Jason Krekel serve up an exciting live show to music lovers thirsty for upbeat, original refreshment. Delicious harmonies glide over electrified ukulele, juke-joint guitar, scratchy fiddle and pulsing foot percussion. Catchy songs are steeped in raw rockabilly with shreds of doo wop and devilish blues. Drink deep – Mad Tea Party concocts a musical recipe that will make you boogie.

The Mad Tea Party “Invitation to the Blues” live @ Grey Eagle, Asheville, NC 2.27.2010

The Tim Krekel Orchestra: Led by the late & great Tim Krekel

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by Justin Picard

published: Monday, May 24, 2010

www.musicmarauders.com (You can read the full interview at the link)

As the release of the new album “Thief” by Keller and the Keels approached, I had the pleasure of speaking with guitar slinger Larry Keel. Leading up to it, I was really excited about this interview as I am a big fan of Larry’s music.

J-man: So, Growing up and what led you to mountain music?

Larry: When I was growing up, my father was a banjo player and my brother is a guitar player. We always had friends playing music around us. They came from the mountains of southwest Virginia, so they sort of brought it to the Northern Virginia area with them.

J-man: How do you approach your shows night after night?

Larry: I approach them as, I want to give the crowd the very best of me that I can give them. And that I arrange my sets so that it’s the absolute funnest time that can be had that night.

J-man: Right on. How does it feel when a bluegrass icon like Del McCoury takes and covers one of your songs, also featuring it on one of his albums “The Company We Keep“?

Larry: Oh, it’s totally amazing. It’s like a dream come true. It really is. They are so good at what they do, it’s just nice to hear my idea come to such fruition.

J-man: You’ve had a chance to play with them several times. What’s that like?

Larry: Yeah, we’re really good friends. We’ve been running into each other for many years. I guess twenty years or more. I love playing with him. I think they’re the greatest bluegrass band in the world today.

J-man: I agree… I’m a huge fan.

Larry: (Laughs) Me too.

J-man: (Laughs) When I listened to the new album “Thief” it has an almost sitting around the campfire feel to it…

Larry: Yeah, for the feel; we wanted it to feel real natural. It’s a lot of Keller’s ideas. He has boundless ideas of songs to play. Whether I know them or not, I’ll learn them and we rehearse them and go out and play them. It seems like everybody else knows them (Laughs).


J-man: (Laughs)How did you get involved with Keller Williams and what are your thoughts on what he does musically?

Larry: Oh, man. How did I get involved with Keller? I think it was a while back… I’d say almost twenty years. We were playing a lot of the same clubs, around the Fredericksburg area. I forget what his band was called. I think it was the All Natural Band. We just liked what he did, the band I was in. We hit it off right away, pretty much and just began playing music all over the country together in different places. I’ll tell you; he’s one of the most creative people that I’ve met… He really is.

J-man: I have to say, of all of the Keller projects/bands; the project he does with you guys is by far my favorite.

Larry: Well thank you, thank you. We just really get along great and we hope that translates to the music.

J-man: I think it does.

Larry: Wonderful.

J-man: The Riverboat Record Release Party, sounds like a pretty unique happening. What prompted that event and what are your thoughts on releasing the new album to one hundred diehard fans, on a boat?

Larry: Well it is a totally unique.. I’ll say “show”, for a lack of a better word at that point. It came about because Keller lives on or near the Rappahannock River and he sees that riverboat going up and down. He and his team worked it out with the coast guard and everybody to where we could have a hundred people on there. I feel it’s a really excellent way to release the cd. It’s special, it’s very special.

J-man: … What are you thoughts on Jamgrass music and what it provides or takes away from traditional bluegrass music?

Larry: Jamgrass music, it seems; sort of exploded out of the Colorado area. With Leftover Salmon, and later; Yonder Mountain… I guess you could put String Cheese in that area, but they’re not grassy.

J-man: Right.

Larry: I feel it’s sort of the western take on bluegrass music. Coming from a younger audience and bluegrass music sort of started from all of the Irish music and a lot of swing and blues. It’s a big hodge-podge of music that created bluegrass and it seemed like it was launched and founded in the Blue Ridge Mountains out here. A lot of great players came from southwest Virginia; Ralph Stanley and Don Reno and Kentucky with Bill Monroe of course.

I see Jamgrass as a young persons take on bluegrass. Where bluegrass, was and sort of still is liked by an older generation. It’s good in a way, because that’s continuing on, preserving bluegrass. Jamgrass is helping to preserve bluegrass.

J-man: I agree with that. It’s not very typical to hear folks say that. A lot of bluegrass musicians have come to shun jamgrass music.

Larry: Yeah, I know… and I don’t feel that should be done. If someone is really putting their heart and energy into the music, how can you judge them?

J-man: Right. Speaking of jamgrass, you have a project with Adam Aijala from Yonder. Can you talk about how your project with Adam came about and the full sound that the two of you create?

Larry: I guess it was probably ten years ago, I was doing a big run of shows with Yonder Mountain String Band and I was sort of the supporting act, doing a solo guitar act. At the end of my sets, Adam would come up and play two or three guitar tunes with me, before they came on. So it was a special sort of thing.

We, throughout the years we honed it in to playing some music that we want to play. Adam has such a diverse repertoire. I mean he listens to punk music, and heavy metal… All kinds of different influences. He’ll bring a song to the table that you wouldn’t figure would be a song that would sound good with two guitars. But, by the time we work it out and get our own feel on it, it’s cool stuff and I think, there again; that’s the kind of stuff that turns the heads of a lot of young people towards bluegrass. Because it’s something they know, or like. Like I said, I don’t know a lot of these songs. I had sort of a strict bluegrass raisin’ you know? It’s interesting for me to learn all of this diverse material and it’s a royal blast.

J-man: Additionally, your playing translates well to that sort of style. The full sound being created by the two guitars, immediately draws folks attention.

Larry: Well, thank you. He is an incredible player (Laughs) and every time I pick with him it seems like he’s gone steps and steps beyond what he was the last time; and that was incredible, so…


J-man: Yeah, absolutely. It must be a really special thing, playing and sharing the music you love with your wife, Jenny. Can you talk about what playing music with her means to you?

Larry: Yeah, you know; it really is special. We decided long ago that we wanted to melt our career together to where we could be together all of the time, because that’s what we wanted. We have a happy time… I can say we never fight or any of that, but you know how that goes… That would only be good press (Laughs).

J-man: (Laughs)

Larry: It’s a great time and it’s awesome having someone on the same page.

J-man: The year 2009 hits and I see your music was featured in a documentary film about promoting environmental protection in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. As well, you hosted a “Bass & Grass” fishing technique camp in southern Georgia, also hosting a camp in Ohio at Jorma’s guitar camp. What prompted your directional and conscious shift towards other means of sharing music?

Larry: You know… I’m not the type that just wants to have an extremely laid out perfect course for myself. I like to keep all of my avenues open, just seein’ what’s out there because it’s so enriching when you actually open you eyes and see what’s going on. A lot of the teaching events are so worth while. It is, it’s like giving back in a way, but it gives back to me to be able to see someone getting better at being a musician and finding happiness in that. Or getting out and forgetting about their troubles for a bit and grabbing a fishing pole. Or like you said with the mountaintop removal… that’s just, in my opinion; a heinous crime. If I can let people know about it any way I can, I’ll do so.

J-man: (Laughs) … But what kind of strings are you using, Larry?

Larry: I use D’Addario Strings…


READ THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE: http://www.musicmarauders.com/2010/05/interview-larry-keel.html

www.larrykeel.com

Rex Thomson of MusicMarauders Review of “Thief”.

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