Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2010

Dehlia Low CD release parties:

The Get Down ~ West Asheville
Friday, November 5th, 2010

The Garage ~ Winston Salem, NC
Friday, November 12th, 2010
w/ local openers Porch Dog Revival

The Evening Muse ~ Charlotte, NC
Saturday, November 13th, 2010
w/ Belleville Outfit

Emerging out of Asheville, North Carolina’s roots renaissance, Dehlia Low echoes the sounds of early country with a strong bluegrass flavor, crafting a fresh originality that feels like home.

Since the release of their second studio album “Tellico” in 2009, Dehlia Low has traveled across the U.S. in support of the album, including appearances at Merlefest, Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival, Appalachian Uprising, Pickathon, Jammin’ at Hippie Jack’s, Durango Meltdown and Bristol Rhythm & Roots. Dehlia Low’s most recent release “Dehlia Low – Liveshowcases the group’s exceptional songwriting talent and outstanding vocal and instrumental performances recorded during the 2010 season at notable venues in the southeast including the Grey Eagle, Down Home and Mockingbird.

Dehlia Low’s had great success with their first two albums; both being listed within the top 20 of 100 releases in 2008 and 2009 on WNCW. They are also featured on a Live MerleFest compilation for 2010 for the Bluegrass trust fund.

“…one of those kinds of bands that I just really fall in love with. They’re called Dehlia Low and at the bare bones, they’re a string band, but…in a way string bands used to be when there wasn’t such a genre splint of what country music was and what bluegrass music was and what blues music was. It’s where those points converge for me. They’re primarily writing their own material, very strong material, and they’re one of those bands that you’re going to start hearing a lot more of.” ~ Iaan Hughes, No Depression

Dehlia low on the web:
www.dehlialow.com
twitter.com/dehlialow
www.reverbnation.com/dehlialow
www.facebook.com/pages/Dehlia-Low
www.myspace.com/dehlialow

Read Full Post »

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS!*

We are offering two free tickets to whoever can convincingly write “why they should receive two free tickets to this week’s Asheville Vaudeville Halloween Special”?

Post your answer as a comment to this blog.

Asheville Vaudeville Halloween

Fri, October 29th & Sat the 30th
Gala and Costume Party at 6:30PM both nights, show at 7:30
Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St.
$12 tickets available at the Box Office or at AshevilleVaudeville.com

____________________________________________________

Asheville’s LARGEST vaudeville variety show returns with an all-new Halloween Special featuring some of Western North Carolina’s BEST comedy, juggling, magic, acrobatics, aerial arts, short plays, sideshow and more!

We’ve pulled out all the stops this time to bring you more than 45 of the region’s most sensational performers in an all-local, all-Asheville production that includes the contributions of more than 20 regional theatre companies and performance troupes. And to top it all: Asheville Vaudeville just won “Best Live Show in WNC” in the 2010 Mountain Xpress Reader’s Poll!

That’s right folks: we’ve got everything from acrobats to belly dancing on stilts, sketch comedy, knife juggling, opera, aerial arts, marionettes and more – culminating in TWO full nights of entertainment.

Asheville Vaudeville is a charity organization that gives A THIRD of all ticket proceeds to MANNA Food Bank. Two sold out houses feeds 5,000 meals to our hungry friends and neighbors

Visit www.AshevilleVaudeville.com and buy your tickets today!

Also find them on facebook and twitter:

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS!*

We are offering two free tickets to whoever can convincingly write “why they should receive two free tickets to this week’s Asheville Vaudeville Halloween Special”?

Post your answer as a comment to this blog.

*Ticket contest deadline is Thursday night at 2am. Make your post by then and you will be entered to win a pair of tickets. Winners will be notified through this blog on Friday by Noon. You can choose the night that you wish to attend.

Read Full Post »

This is Asheville based band Galen Kipar Project with Lyndsay Pruett performing “How I’ve Changed” at the Amphitheater stage on Thursday at the 2010 MagnoliaFest at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak, FL! It was filmed by Gary Reckard.

Read more about MagnoliaFest at these two blogs:

Read Full Post »

Positive Friction: A Q&A with Jeb Puryear of Donna the Buffalo
By Geoff Gehman

This material first appeared on the web-site of the Sellersville Theater 1894 at www.st94.com.

DtB photo by Jim Gevenus

Donna the Buffalo is dedicated to groovy grooves. The band’s five members specialize in upbeat idioms—calypso, zydeco, old-time mountain fiddle—and upbeat lyrics about the state of unions and Unions. They promote virtues—loyalty, charity, curiosity—as founding hosts of two grass-roots cultural festivals—a summer extravaganza on their home turf of Trumansburg, N.Y., and a spring/fall lollapalooza in Silk Hope, N.C. They have a phenomenal following known as The Herd, whose supporters raise money for healthy causes while dancing until the bison roost.

DtB, which plays Sellersville on Oct. 28, is led by guitarist Jeb Puryear and Tara Nevins (fiddle/accordion/scrubboard), who sing lead on songs they write independently. In a recent phone interview Puryear discussed the ups and downs of everything from not having a set list to a Caribbean cruise that was a little too free at sea.

Jeb Puryear. photo by Jim Gavenus

Q: I hear you don’t sleep much during the GrassRoots Festival up in
Trumansburg. What do you get–eight hours in four days?

A: That may be generous [laughs].

Q: Describe a day in the life of Jeb Puryear during last summer’s festival.

A: Well, I usually start the whole festival off by playing in Bubba George, an old-time string band I was in when I was a kid. And then I played in Donna and after that I went and saw Merle Haggard and then I did a set with Keith Frank and then the Believers wanted me to play bass on their set—and they had two sets. For some reason I stayed up all night every night this year. We’re much more invested than many festival organizers. But, then, it’s very exciting to be able to play all that music with so many different folks. With a job like that, you’d just want to be worked to
death.

Q: Is there anything you miss from the festival’s bygone days?

A: I miss the stress [laughs]. Actually, that’s sort of a joke. A lot of people don’t realize that we had absolutely no money when we decided to start a festival. We borrowed $5,000 from a friend of ours and we basically talked the whole thing up. It was touch-and-go at the beginning. Most of the people who do that sort of thing have some kind of money [laughs]. It was really brave and bold and the right thing to do. In the early years I was involved in the day-to-day activities of the office. Today, the office staff absorbs whatever stress there is. They take care of the thing better than we ever did.

Jeb Puryear and Tara Nevins. Photo by John D Kurc

Q: You and Tara met through the old-time fiddle circuit. What was the first clue that you and she could work well together.

A: She was about the first person we met who played songs that sounded like songs you might hear on the radio. Working with her, we learned how to play more song-based music than tune based. She was booked into this vegetarian restaurant and we wound up getting booked there. We were lucky enough that the whole thing worked. People danced to the fast stuff and the slow stuff right from the start. I don’t know why people like to move while we’re playing. It might be because we’re moving all the time.

Q: What are some essential differences between you and Tara as songwriters.

A: I tend to be a little more wordy. She tends to have a little more melody. Over our history I’ve probably been more pointedly political. Our songwriting is different the same way men and women are different: you have to respect the differences. It’s a pretty cool thing to get those male-female perspectives one after the other.

Q: Can you point to a recent band breakthrough, a significant point of departure when you really hit your stride?

A: Last year me and Tara started doing duet shows. Me and her have been playing music for a really long time and because we’ve been at it for so long we can change tempos and styles and it always stays together. The rest of the people in the band saw those shows and decided that the five of us should be as tight, as all together, as the two of us. Since then we’ve really been having a lot more fun.

Q: What kind of democracy is Donna the Buffalo? For example, who gets to choose the set lists?

A: We have a very distorted democracy [laughs]. As far as set lists go, we don’t ever write one. When my brother Jordon was in the group he used to write set lists and they were pretty good. When he left, we started writing set lists and they weren’t very good [laughs]. Now either one of us [Puryear or Nevins] will start playing a song and we try to keep it moving best we can. One good thing about not having a set list is that at least one person in the band feels like playing the song we’re playing. Because we don’t do a set list, sometimes we’ll forget about a song for a number of months. [Keyboardist] Dave [McCracken] has recently been trying to get us to do the older songs more often. I was never really big on change throughout my whole life. But now I’m slowly coming around to realizing it’s not only necessary but inevitable. If you’re going to change, you might as well swivel around and make the change a good one.

Q: I’m always curious about the afterlife of songs—about their zigzag path after you introduce them to the world. Is there one of your tunes that has had a rich side career at weddings, funerals or some other rite of passage?

A: Well, some people propose onstage during our shows; that’s kind of exciting. And we once played at a very personal engagement. Our friend George wanted to propose to his girlfriend Althea, so we showed up nonchalantly and we started playing while he got down on his knees. The song was “This Goes”: the complete line is “This goes to someone I love.” That was pretty cool.

Tara Nevins. Photo by Matt Dunmore

Q: The Herd is the band’s power base, a fellow charitable institution. What is something about The Herd that most non-members don’t know?

A: The main thing I like to say about The Herd is that you don’t have to do anything to be a member. You just have to like a song. Actually, I don’t know if you have to go that far. The herd is a very amorphous thing. They’ve done a lot of good things. One time we all went down to some resort in Key West to do a Herd fundraiser. They set up a stage on the lawn by the beach and we played there for a week. And someone added up all the money that got spent and it was a lot of money. And I thought we directed that a little bit.

Q: What were the highlights of your Caribbean cruise with The Herd?

A: Actually, we’ve done two cruises. The first one wasn’t a real joke but it was a  lark. You know, there’s a small part of everyone who would like to go on a cruise but not be stuck on the ship. We had like 850 people on this boat, and they were our people. And the feeling was: Okay, well, we can all be stuck together. We did a second cruise a few years later. In the middle we went to St. John and the federales came and expelled maybe 10 people for smoking marijuana. It was a bit of an entrapment because if you’re out in the Caribbean and you’re playing Bob Marley on the deck, what are these poor people to do? But they were doing it blatantly and the security guy got personally offended. So we’re playing in the lounge that night and we’re wondering: Are we supposed to have fun now? I mean, all our friends just got thrown off the boat. It’s like that first moment after someone dies and you’re supposed to carry on with your life and you’re not sure how. And our old drummer Tom [Gilbert]—who is a very funny guy—says: “Man, I’ve felt more awkward vibes watching porno with my parents” [laughs].

Q: What’s up next? A boxed set of rarities? A carnival tent tour? Would you like to do what the White Stripes did: make a documentary about playing cafes, parking lots and other pick-up places?

A: I would like to do all those things. A carnival tent tour we talked about. A boxed set of rarities would be great. Actually, we’re planning a record featuring our greatest guests, including some of the people we’ve invited to play songs with us at the end of grass-roots festivals. And I would love to play very small towns all over New York state, towns with just a few houses and a bar. A tiny town tour—that would be cool.

Q: You know, the Moody Blues once considered buying an English village to headquarter their many operations. Have you guys ever been tempted to make a smaller communal real-estate transaction?

A: No–our way of hippiedom is just post-commune. Utopianism is a beautiful subject but if you don’t take it as a challenge, the endless meetings and shared everything will just drive you insane. Especially when you’re in a band. The whole notion of equality in society is interesting but not very realistic. It just kind of doesn’t happen. If you put any five kids together in a room, one of them will become the leader of the others, and nobody thinks that’s weird. That’s not to say that the people who are smart and strong should ruthlessly take advantage of everybody else. There’s all this fine-line interplay about being a communist or a capitalist, a Republican or a Democrat, when it’s pretty much the same subject. People are just fishing around to find the best way to do things.


Fact File: Donna the Buffalo

o The band’s name is a funkier version of the original proposed name Dawn of the Buffalo.

o Annual attendance at its Finger Lakes GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance in Trumansburg, N.Y., has increased from nearly 1,500 to more than 15,000 over 19 years.

o Keyboardist Dave McCracken once toured with zydeco star C.J. Chenier and the Red Hot Louisiana Band.

o In 2005, Fiddler Tara Nevins prepared a documentary on Carlton Frank, the late, great Creole fiddler.

o DtB songs have been licensed for the cartoon Living Evil, created by Yanni Osmond and Spanky the Woman Tamer.

[Find out more information about DtB’s upcoming show at the Sellerville Theatre on Oct 28th]

Read Full Post »

…So the Mad Tea Party is just cranking out the fun new videos!

Not only is Jason Krekel in the Mad Tea Party and a one man band on the fiddle, vocals, guitar, foot percussion; but he also helps to run the HandCranked Letterpress.

Krekel is offering a special on Monster Prints on his Etsy site (www.krekprints.com). Here’s a video of them being made…

Read Full Post »

NEW video by Asheville, NC band, The Mad Tea Party, “Hey Teabaggers, Leave Our Party Alone!”

Read Full Post »

Here’s some excerpts from a great interview with the Mad Tea Party about their new Halloween EP- Rock n Roll Ghoul

The Blue Banner: www.thebluebanner.net

By Anne Louise Bouchard – Staff Writer

Mad Tea Party, a musical duo from Asheville, got its name from the children’s book “Alice in Wonderland.”

“I was thinking about being Alice in Wonderland. Becoming a musician is a lot like jumping down the rabbit hole. It’s a leap of faith and a new world. It’s sort of surreal. You are really big and then small, really confident then insecure,” said Ami Worthen, singer and ukulele player for Mad Tea Party.

Worthen said Mad Tea Party’s name is whimsical and fun.

“Ultimately, it’s about having fun,” she said.

… … …

The songs on the band’s new album Rock ‘n’ Roll Ghoul are all Halloween-related. “It’s our second Halloween release. The first was The Zombie Boogie. We love Halloween. It’s fun to play with that theme,” she said.

The idea for their album came from Krekel.

“Jason had this image in his mind of someone in the business who metaphorically eats the flesh of the artist,” Worthen said.

The new album’s artwork features the Rock ‘n’ Roll Ghoul devouring a human arm.

Worthen said their music as a mix of garage rock, rockabilly, and ’50s and ’60s rock.

“Southern Cultures on the Skids are really similar to us,” she said.

She also said that to an extent they are like The White Stripes. King Khan & BBQ Show has also had a big influence on the band, Worthen said.

Worthen said they want people to have a good time when they listen to their music.

“We want to give people a sense of abandonment, a sense of joyfulness and passion,” she said.

She said their live shows are really high energy.

“Our music is really driving. It’s a lot about rocking out,” she said.

Worthen said the audience affects their live shows. “It’s a partnership between band and audience,” she said.

“An engaged audience is going to make us play better,” she said. Worthen also said a good sound system really makes the show. “If the sound is bad, we have trouble connecting with the audience.”

Worthen said she believes their duo provides a unique experience that listeners may not expect.

“Our society as a whole doesn’t place as much value on live performance or on handmade art. We have a homogenized tendency. We shop at the same store, eat at the same place, listen to the same radio. In any given town in the U.S., you can eat and shop at the same place as the other town,” Worthen said.

She said things that are different are looked at with skepticism.

“There is a barrier to being an independent,” she said.

… … …

Worthen said what makes them different is their instrumentation. “Jason is a one-man band.

He plays the drums with his feet and his guitar,” she said. Worthen herself plays the electric ukulele.

Worthen said their band is not for everyone and appeals to a niche of people. “We are for a person who is an independent thinker and wants to discover something off the beaten path,” she said.

Worthen said she thinks it is important to be authentic. “At the end of the day, looking back, what’s the most important? You had a million fans and you were not making the music you believe, or you had a thousand fans and you made the music you wanted to?” she said. “Authenticity is the most satisfying.”

READ THE FULL POSThttp://www.thebluebanner.net/arts-features/mad-tea-party-releases-new-ghoulish-album-1.1717282

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »