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Archive for May, 2011

Dehlia Low is playing at the Aiken Bluegrass Festival this weekend in South Carolina. And they are in the good company of Larry Keel and Natural Bridge, Big Daddy Bluegrass Band, Town Mountain, Taylor Martin’s Engine and more! Don Rhodes witt hhe Sugusta Chronicle did a fatastic interview with vocalist and fiddler, Anya Hinkle, Heer are some excerpts, click the link for the full article.

It is 8 a.m. Tuesday of last week, and Anya Hinkle is riding to her job as a biologist in Highlands, N.C., on a field campus of the University of North Carolina.

Her day job is totally different from her weekend gigs as fiddle player, songwriter and lead vocalist with the Asheville-based bluegrass band Dehlia Low.

Two years ago, local bluegrass fans got to hear the five-piece band for the first time at Still Water Tap Room on Broad Street.

Anya Hinkle’s bandmates are Stacy Claude from Atlanta on guitar; Aaron Ballance from Winston-Salem, N.C., on dobro; Bryan Clendenin from Hurricane, W.Va., on mandolin; and Greg Stiglets from Jackson, Miss., on upright bass.

The band came together in late 2007 when each of them migrated to Asheville about the same time.

Photo by Sandlin Gaither

“I love duet singing, especially those early brothers duos,” Hinkle said, “and the Stanley brothers (Ralph and Carter) were my favorites. Stacy and I met just after I moved to Asheville from Blacksburg, Va., and began doing a lot of duet singing. She knew Aaron, and he started playing with us.”

It wasn’t long before Clendenin and Stiglets also became part of their regular performances.

… … …
Last year, the band achieved a new level of status by performing at the major Merlefest bluegrass and country music festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., and at the Gettysburg (Pa.) Bluegrass Festival.

Immediately after the Gettysburg appearance, Hinkle posted in a blog, “It was simply hard to believe that 24 hours before we were backstage with Allison Krauss (and) playing on exactly the same stage as they were (Krauss’ Union Station band); the memory of it like some kind of dream.”

The band’s third CD, titled Live, came out in November containing live performances recorded at several venues.

With the increasing success of Dehlia Low, the members are about to take one of the biggest risks of their lives: quitting their day jobs and trying to make music full time.

Besides Hinkle being a biologist, Balance works with horses at Biltmore Estate; Stiglets and his wife have a crafts business; Clendenin teaches middle school students; and Claude has a publicity and promotion business.

“We’re all married or in long-term relationships, and we’re all worried about taking care of our kids and having insurance and being able to hold on to our houses,” Hinkle said.

“But last year we reached the point of thinking, ‘If we could get a management team together with bookings and publicity and a good record company, we should give this a shot.'”

With that team in place, they are eager but apprehensive about taking this leap of faith. They are encouraged, though, that their fourth CD, Ravens and Crows , is due out Aug. 2 on the prestigious Rebel Records label, the oldest national bluegrass music recording company.

Ravens and Crows , being recorded in Asheville, is being produced by Travis Book of the Grammy-nominated group The Infamous Stringdusters.

“Between our music and the business side of things, we’ve put together a musical project with our band that seems to be getting some traction both regionally and nationally,” Hinkle said. “And in the process, it has been creating so much change in our own personal lives.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT: http://chronicle.augusta.com/things-do/applause/2011-05-11/dehlia-low-continues-ladder-success?v=1305150749

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Called the “SteelPan Jazz Rock Star” by the Caiso Steel Band, Jonathan Scales is brings this traditional Caribbean instrument into the uncharted territories filled with jazz/rock metric complexities for the modern ear. Fresh into a new release of his third album, Character Farm & Other Short Stories, Jonathan Scales tours in Tennessee this May!

The Jonathan Scales Fourchestra is fronted by classically trained composer turned steel pan maestro, Jonathan Scales, who is heavily influenced by the complexity of banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck to the hustle of Jay-Z. Gritty blues guitarist, Duane Simpson, and fusion-chops bassist, Cody Wright, provide the harmonic support for Scales’ sound, while jazz/hip-hop drummer, Phill Bronson, drives the time-shifting, modern grooves. The cast of Characters hold this mind-bending concoction together with jazz edge and classical sensibility.

Come to the Fourchestra’s free ‘teaser’ set at The Basement on Tuesday, May 17th and let yourself boil over in anticipation for Friday the 20th’s show at the French Quarter Cafe, where they play a double bill with Nashville’s own steel pan master, Tony Hartman, and his band The Great Barrier Reefs. The Fourchestra also plays just 45 minutes away in Mufreesboro on Thursday, May 19th.
Character Farm solidifies Jonathan Scales’ place as one of western North Carolina’s most innovative and creative artists. Not only as a performer, but as the composer of all the music on the album, Scales is a groundbreaker,” states The Boone Mountain Times.

The album is a 45-minute dive deeper into the compositionally-twisted work of steel pannist Jonathan Scales. The nine original instrumental “stories” on the album take listeners from the primal Jam We Did to the lush Hallucinations of the Dream Chasers. The title track Character Farm takes the audience into a chilled, ‘worldly’ ride after the frantically emotional The Longest December. Guest appearance on the record include Jeff Coffin (of Dave Matthews Band / Bela Fleck & the Flecktones), Yonrico Scott and Kofi Burbridge (of Derek Trucks Band fame) and the dazzling work of fiddle virtuoso Casey Driessen.

“Through the album’s countless turns, Scales manages to blend in the very particular sound of steel pan seamlessly with everything from a flute, horn and saxophone to the oft-accompanying electric guitar, all while showing off the easily stereotyped instrument in a new light,” declares Kevin Jones from Exclaim.CA.

Show Details at a Glance:

Tues, May 17 ~ The Basement ~ Nashville

Thurs, May 19 ~ Liquid Smoke ~ Murfreesboro

Fri, May 20 ~ The French Quarter Cafe w/ The Great Barrier Reefs ~ Nashville

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Scales’ created a wonderful  Music Video for the song “Muddy Vishnu” from the album:

“…the visual for steel pan player Jonathan Scales’ “Muddy Vishnu” is almost like a Being John Malkovich set inside Scales’ own world of found rhythms, visions, colors, friends, inspirations and rare silence.” – Alli Marshall, Asheville’s Mountain Xpress


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Festival season, and Fishin season, are on and the Keels are making their rounds across the country. Both Larry and Jenny Keel did a couple of great inerviews that were published last week.  Here are some excerpts:

Flat-picking guitar player Larry Keel lives a simple life of bluegrass and fishing for bass, trout or about anything else with fins.  By Bill Lynch with the WV Gazette.
Flat-picker Larry Keel is pretty much exactly how he sounds — a down-to-earth, plain-spoken country boy who just happens to be one of the best bluegrass guitarists in the country.
. . .   . . .   . . .

Sometimes, he comes for the music. Sometimes, he comes for the fishing. Sometimes, he comes for both. Keel loves to fish almost as much as he loves to play bluegrass.

“I try to fish wherever I go,” he said. “We travel a lot, and I’m always looking for a watering hole — any place where I can cast a line.”

A few years ago, he and a couple of partners got the idea to combine sport fishing with bluegrass picking. They started a company called Fishin and Pickin.

. . .   . . .    . . .

Finding like minds has never been too difficult for Keel. He’s always had a talent for surrounding himself with or finding people who, like him, are dedicated to making quality music — and like to fish. Aside from and sometimes alongside his band, Keel often collaborates with artists like Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna’s Jorma Kaukonen and indie folk rocker Keller Williams.

“I’ve got a band I really love,” he said. “We’ve got Mark Schimick on mandolin, and he’s just a powerhouse. Will Lee plays the five-string banjo.”

Lee is the son of bluegrass guitarist Rickey Lee, who played guitar and sang with the Stanley Brothers.

“Will and me have been playing together for about 25 years now,” Keel said.

The two met while performing during the Old Fiddler’s Convention in Galax, Va. They’ve been fishing for nearly as long.

Keel’s wife, Jenny, rounds out the quartet, playing upright bass and singing harmony.

“The music is really tight,” he said. “It’s just sounding so good.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://wvgazette.com/Entertainment/201105041492

and here is a nice interview with Jenny Keel:

Bluegrass artist reels in wife, bandmate. Musician creates website for anglers, pickers

Larry Keel might be hard-pressed to choose between his two passions: bluegrass and fishing.

In fact, on a day set aside for interviews, Keel got a chance to go fishing and with the blessing of his wife and bandmate, Jenny, he went.

“I actually love to fish, too, but I have to hold down the fort,” she joked from their Virginia home.

Fortunately, he finds ways to combine the two – he recently launched a new project and Website called Fishin’ and Pickin’ at www.fishinandpickin.com.

The site has lots of fishing and music tips and a schedule of workshops and camps Keel and friends host on live water properties that teach fellow musicians how to improve both their picking skills and their hooking skills.

. . .    . . .    . . .Jenny said these days the band members prefer to be weekend warriors, although they can do three shows in a long weekend when they plan strategically.

She said they need the time at home, not just to fish, but to handle the logistics.

“We’re very self-managed and self-produced,” she said.

Larry currently is working on his next album, with 13 others already under his belt.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.dailymail.com/Entertainment/201105041626?page=2&build=cache


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Tara Nevins is sharing the song “Stars Fell on Alabama” from the new album Wood and Stone. This is Nevins’ version of the jazz classic. She was commissioned to rewrite this song for the soundtrack to “20 Years After” a post-apocalyptic movie directed by Jim Torres in Huntsville, Alabama.

“‘Wood and Stone’ is strangely hypnotic at times, with its mesmerizing rhythms and Nevins’ relaxed but commanding delivery. The beautifully dark “Tennessee River” and her cover of the jazz standard, ‘Stars Fell On Alabama,’ are entrancing and highlight Nevins’ beautiful voice” – Boone Mountain Times

Listen to “Stars Fall on Alabama”

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“Opening with a mournful fiddle and Rose Sinclair’s poignant banjo and even though I am familiar with at least two dozen other renditions of the song, it’s as though I heard it for the first time. It is stunning in its quietness.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

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TaraNevins.com

You can also find Tara on facebook  facebook.com/TaraNevins

and DonnaTheBuffalo.com


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Wood and Stone is available at:
iTunes: http://www.itunes.com/taranevins
Amazon: http://amzn.to/lcEglg

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“Larry has taken Tara’s music to an entirely higher level, if this doesn’t turn into an award winner they’ll have been cheated!” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association “as invigorating as it is mesmerizing.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

“Campbell and Nevins work some real magic here”  – Hyperbolium

“The sound is both loose and tight at the same time; the band knows how to walk that line and let Nevins be herself. To put it simply, it just plain works.”  – Brian Robbins, Jambands.com

“As much as I have listened to “Mule to Ride” during the past twelve years, I, like many other Donna fans,  have also yearned to hear Tara in her own voice, on her own terms. The new album is just that — and more.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

“‘Stars Fell On Alabama’ is Tara’s version of an old standard, while ‘Tennessee River’ sounds like she’s written a new standard.” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association

“The pedigree of the album is staggering.  Start with Nevins, who has been an integral member of DTB since its formation in 1987, and add producer Larry Campell along with guest performers Levon Helm, Jim Lauderdale, Allison Moorer, and Teresa Williams, and you get a record that is as solid as the building materials mentioned in the title.” – Fifty Cent Lighter Blog

“‘What Money Cannot Buy’ and ‘The Wrong Side’ are two different versions on ‘I’ve been wronged”’ songs, the latter being one of the most upbeat sounding takes on breaking up that I’ve ever heard.” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association

“But even that great track [The Wrong Side] did not prepare me for what comes next, the only song Tara did not write, the jazz vocal standard, “Stars Fell on Alabama.” Opening with a mournful fiddle and Rose Sinclair’s poignant banjo and even though I am familiar with at least two dozen other renditions of the song, it’s as though I heard it for the first time. It is stunning in its quietness.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

“If you like the fiddle, in almost all it’s various forms, and want to wade into something with country, old time, zydeco, cajun, and maybe even some bluegrass touches, you couldn’t do better than to start with this CD.” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association

“her songs stretch out across all her influences, including fiddle- and steel-lined country, second line rhythms and the Cajun sounds of her earlier band, the Heartbeats.”  – Hyperbolium

“… her music takes on the spirit of the [Levon Helm] Barn like a well-worn and cozy Gypsy jacket that was tailored to her shoulders.” – Brian Robbins, Jambands.com

“Producer Larry Campbell fits each song with a unique groove and adds superb electric and pedal steel guitar. The girlishness in Nevins’ voice and the layering of double-tracked vocals add a hint of the Brill Building, which is a terrific twist on the rustic arrangements.”  – Hyperbolium

“… Riding high from producing two Grammy Award winners for Helm, Campbell keeps things bright and tight without giving up intimacy.  And, that’s the charm of this album, the sense of getting a peek into Nevins’ splendid soul and her vast woodsy song repertoire.” –Billing Gazette

“soulful country groove” – Hyperbolium


“‘Wood and Stone’ is strangely hypnotic at times, with its mesmerizing rhythms and Nevins’ relaxed but commanding delivery. The beautifully dark “Tennessee River” and her cover of the jazz standard, ‘Stars Fell On Alabama,’ are entrancing and highlight Nevins’ beautiful voice” – Boone Mountain Times

“The lyrics cast an eye on relationships that refuse to live up to their potential, with music that underlines the certainty of a woman who will no longer suffer others’ indecision, inaction or infidelity.”  – Hyperbolium

“‘Wood and Stone’ is not emotionally-wrenching, rather it is a wise retrospective of the joys and sorrows of love. Nevins’ writing isn’t that of an angry divorcee, so don’t expect the album to be a diatribe on men. Her writing is a reflection of experiences to which anyone can relate.”  – Boone Mountain Times

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Celebrated Donna the Buffalo artist, Tara Nevins, will be performing at Levon Helm’s Midnight Ramble on Saturday, May 28th
! Release of Introspective Solo Album “Wood and Stone” produced by Larry Campbell

Tara Nevins
Midnight Ramble

Levon Helm Studios
Saturday, May 28, 2011

Gates open at 6pm, studio doors open at 7pm and the show starts at 8pm
STANDING ROOM ONLY!!

160 Plochmann Lane
Woodstock, NY 12498
845.679.2744
http://levonhelm.com/midnight_ramble.htm

For ticket rates and to order, visit: http://levonhelm.com/store/page4.html
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Buy the album:
Itunes: http://www.itunes.com/taranevins
Amazon: http://amzn.to/lcEglg
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American roots traditionalist Tara Nevins releases an exploration of her own heritage, musical and otherwise, in Wood and Stone, her first solo album since Mule to Ride in 1999, both on Sugar Hill Records. Wood and Stone showcases her ever-evolving repertoire as she journeys both back to her own “roots” and head-long into new territory. Set for a May 3rd release, the album was produced by Larry Campbell and recorded at Levon Helm Studios in Woodstock, NY, the home of the Ramble! Featured guests on the album include Levon Helm, Jim Lauderdale, Allison Moorer, Teresa Williams, The Heartbeats, along with the core band of Larry Campbell, Justin Guip, and Byron Isaacs.

Nevins will be performing a set of music from the new album at the Midnight Ramble on Saturday, May 28th. Joining Tara on stage will be Larry Campbell, Justin Guip, Byron Isaacs, Teresa Williams, and The Heartbeats. Shows at the Ramble are personal and intimate, casual and friendly, and always very special. Levon Helm and his fellow musicians play with such joy, energy and enthusiasm at each Ramble, you will find it difficult not to fly out of your seat!

Fans of Nevins from her 21-year tenure with Donna the Buffalo are familiar with her versatile talents; she shares the vocal and songwriting responsibilities for the band and is a stellar musician on fiddle, guitar, and accordion. (She plays a mean scrubboard too.) Prior to DTB, Nevins was a founding member of the all-female, old time/Cajun band The Heartbeats, who also join her on two tracks of the album. Wood and Stone delivers the musical expertise fans have come to expect and surprises with new perspectives.

“This album is personal and sort of revelatory,” Nevins says. “It’s an expression of recent emotional discovery within relationships lost and found, and how knowing the core of who we are is the real deal. There were so many elements I wanted to explore—to combine all the pieces of my personal musical puzzle–and then have it come together in a cohesive whole. I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with Larry Campbell. I am honored to have had him both produce and play on my record. He’s an amazingly talented and soulful musician. He has a very natural, down-to-earth approach and an instinctual insightfulness that I really appreciate; he really got what I was after. The whole experience was inspiring and challenging in a very positive way.”

Campbell is a much-sought-after musician/producer renowned for his work with Bob Dylan and still rolling from the success of Levon Helm’s two Grammy- winners, Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt, which he produced. He found Nevins’s project immediately compelling. “I liked the feel of the project– her combination of old-time mountain music and original songwriting—and I was taken with Tara’s unique talent; she’s got a distinctive voice—there’s a kind of honesty that shines through.”

The record kicks off with the title cut “Wood and Stone,” and that “honest” element is readily apparent in this touching tribute to home and family. Old-timey acoustics are quickly joined by drums and steel guitars as Nevins sings about “the better part of me” regarding her upbringing and early influences. “It’s got that magical blend of music and lyrics,” Campbell says of it, “and it really paints a picture of where she comes from.”

Nevins’s rare blend of enormous talent coupled with genuine down-home humbleness has won the hearts of fans and colleagues alike. “Tara has this worldly awareness combined with a fragile innocence,” Larry Campbell notes, “which makes her songwriting and music very accessible…very appealing.” Wood and Stone is sure to add to that appeal and the Midnight Ramble on May 28th will be a wonderful place to hear it live where it was recorded nestled in the Catskill Mountains.

For Midnight Ramble information, showtimes, and tickets go to http://levonhelm.com/midnight_ramble.htm

For more information on Tara Nevins and Wood and Stone go to www.facebook.com/TaraNevins or www.SugarHillRecords.com
To watch a video interview with Nevins and Larry Campbell discussing the making of the album, visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNjzbzzphNE

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Really pumped up about the Acoustic Syndicate show this Friday, May 6th at the NC Music Factory in Charlotte!

Here is a bit about what they’ve been up to from what they told Ryan Snyder in a recent interview with YES! Weekly:

As the Acoustic Syndicate family grows, a new album finally awaits:

There`s maybe no better way to sum up the outlook of Acoustic Syndicate circa 2005 than the words of Bryon McMurry on the Shelby folk-rock oufit’s song “It Was Good While It Lasted.” “Nothing lasts forever and we find out who we are,” he sang on the band’s 2000 album Tributaries, unaware then that it might be the band’s mantra in only a few years time as they entered an indeterminable furlough. The McMurrys — Bryon, Fitz and cousin Steve — knew just who they were: a close-knit group built upon rural values of sustainability and commitment to the family. When the two brothers began to experience growth in their own families, their incessant touring lifestyle of the past decade suddenly became an afterthought.

“Fitz and Brian were both having to be gone during pregnancies and the last thing we wanted to do is have our families suffer on account of what we’re doing,” said Steve. “It’s important for us to stay centered and understand what’s most important. It was the obvious thing to do at that point.”

The group was arguably going out at their peak. They had just released one of their best-received albums in 2004’s Long Way Round (Sugar Hill), and kicked off the album’s supporting tour with a return to the Bonnaroo Music Festival after performing the inaugural festival two years earlier. Steve says that show in particular was instrumental in that tour’s success.

. . .   . . .    . . .

At the urging of their booking agent Hugh Southard, the group started playing more and more shows around 2007, learning how to juggle being a working band and family men at the same time. The days of 180- 200 shows per year may be over for the band, but Steve says that being able to have their families present has engendered a new kind of creative freedom in them.

As of now, they’re not only looking to begin recording their first album in seven years, but their arrangement is growing as well. Bassist Jay Sanders invited a friend, dobro player Billy Cardine, to join the group for a performance at last year’s Asheville Earth Day Celebration, and Steve said they knew almost immediately that he was a perfect fit for the group.

The addition is progressive for the group’s sound, which Steve describes as being edgier than any other era of the band, and for the first time, they’ll be writing songs specifically to feature a certain instrument. They hope to hit Echo Mountain Recording in Asheville with the pool of 15-16 songs later in 2011, many of which Steve describes as being written from a deeper, more personal place than ever before.

“I always tried to keep songwriting away from my personal life, but there’s been a couple of things in my life with living and people dying. Some major influences that really changed my reality,” he said somewhat hesitantly. “I thought about it and thought about it, and sort of avoided writing anything about it, but something kept bugging me to do it.”

He added that the time away has allowed him and his cousins to refocus their creativity after admittedly becoming burnt out in the year before their hiatus. Reenergized as a group, Steve believes that the band is in as good of a creative place as they’ve ever been.

“When you get burnt out and you start to write songs from the gut, it’s just not good,” he said. “It’s better to be creative out of a desire to be creative and not a need to be creative.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.yesweekly.com/triad/article-11650-as-the-acoustic-syndicate-family-grows-a-new-album-finally-awaits.html

Photo by Bright Life Photography

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The Infamous Stringdusters, a 2011 Grammy-nominated progressive bluegrass band, will headline the third-annual Rooster Walk Music and Arts Festival on Memorial Day weekend near Martinsville, Va.

A six-piece outfit from Nashville, Tenn., the Stringdusters received a Grammy nomination in the Best Country Instrumental Performance category for their song, “Magic #9.” The band will perform at Rooster Walk 3 on Saturday, May 28 at Blue Mountain Festival Grounds.

“We couldn’t be more thrilled to have the Infamous Stringdusters at Rooster Walk this year,” said festival co-founder Johnny Buck. “This is a band that sells out shows across the country and tours abroad. They’ve won some of the biggest awards in the bluegrass world, but they’re also hugely popular on the jamband and ‘newgrass’ music scenes. We can’t thank them enough for coming on board. They are the perfect fit for the atmosphere and vibe we’re trying to cultivate at Rooster Walk.”

The Stringdusters achieved almost instant stardom. In 2007, while touring in promotion of their debut album, “Fork in the Road,” they won three awards at the prestigious International Bluegrass Music Association awards ceremony: Emerging Artist of the Year; Album of the Year; and Song of the Year.

The band’s live performances have been described as “anti-formulaic, groove friendly, and mind‐expanding – not your granddaddy’s bluegrass, unless your granddaddy was Jerry Garcia.”

“We are really intently focused on creating music in the moment,” said Travis Book, vocalist and upright bass player, when asked to describe the band’s style. “That means there’s some improvising and some jamming going on. People are playing different solos every night, and it seems to me to be a more dynamic experience than your typical bluegrass or string-band show. … It’s definitely a good time. That much I know.”

The ‘Dusters just finished a two-day performance at Merlefest over the weekend, where they were once again main-stage performers. Other notable events on their summer tour schedule will include sets at DelFest in Cumberland, Md., the Telluride Bluegrass Festival in Telluride, Colo., the legendary Red Rocks venue in Morrison, Colo., and the band’s own event, The Festy Experience near Charlottesville, Va.

Despite nearly unlimited options, Book said playing at Rooster Walk made sense on a number of levels.

“It sounds like a good time, and that’s largely one of the guiding principals of what we do these days: What sounds like the most fun, for us and for people who want to come be a part of it?” said Book. “And Rooster Walk fits the bill. It’s gonna be a really great time, and that’s one of the most important things to us. Since we’re all just spinning around on this planet, why not try to enjoy it as much as possible?”

The Mantras are a jamband from Greensboro, N.C., with a rapidly growing fanbase

RW3 will feature 19 primary bands. The current lineup offers rock, jam, bluegrass, blues, soul, folk, funk, jazz, country and reggae. Rooster Walk will also feature arts, crafts and food vendors from the area, children’s programming, a new workshop stage and on-site camping.

Bristol-based roots rockers Folk Soul Revival (FSR), this year’s festival hosts, are the only band scheduled to play both nights of the festival.

Asheville, N.C.'s Sanctum Sully will bring their infectious mix of bluegrass, rock, folk and improv Rooster Walk

Other bands performing will include: The Mantras, the Jesse Chong Band, Sanctum Sully, Rob Cheatham & GUNCHUX!, the Lizzy Ross Band, the Kings of Belmont, the Big Fat Gap All-Stars, Jamal Millner & Comrades, Poverty Level with special guest Sammy Shelor, Relacksachian, Travis Elliott, Mariana Bell, the Martinsville Community Jazz Ensemble, Levi’s Gene Pool, Riggs Roberston and the Boys and Girls Club Steel Drum Band.

Rooster Walk honors the memory of two young Martinsville natives who passed away in the last four years: Edwin G. Penn IV and Walker E. Shank. Both were graduating members of Martinsville High School’s class of 2000. Proceeds from the volunteer-led festival go to the Penn-Shank Memorial Scholarship Fund at Martinsville High School.

In two years, organizers have donated $10,000 to the scholarship fund. Sara Kasey, a current freshman at Randolph College, was the inaugural recipient in 2010. The announcement of the second annual winner is expected in May.

General admission tickets for RW3 are currently $40 for a weekend pass and $90 for a VIP weekend pass. Those prices will increase to $50 and $125, respectively, on festival weekend. Tickets are available online or locally at the Southern Virginia Artisan Center in uptown, Binding Time Cafe and Woodall’s Music.

For more information, including details on tickets and band biographies, visit www.roosterwalk.com.

Rooster Walk is a family-friendly festival set for Memorial Day weekend at Blue Mountain Festival Grounds. Last year, 100 percent of all parents survey said they would bring their children back to Rooster Walk 3.

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