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Posts Tagged ‘documentary’

Here’s some great excerpts fom an article about Donna the Buffalo in preview for their show at 123 Plesant Street in Morgantown, WV Jan 22.

Donna the Buffalo Takes the Stage at 123

…  … …
The roots band — which easily blends several genres from folk to reggae — has come through Morgantown for 20 years.
…According to 123 owner L.J. Giuliani, the group’s sound remains consistently infectious.
“… is heavily influenced by a zydeco swing that makes it hard not to dance to,” he said in an email. “That lends itself to a pretty high-energy show that people really love. They have toured the region extensively, so their reputation definitely proceeds them.”
… … …
Nevins said she hopes to see some familiar faces in the crowd, which isn’t an uncommon experience. The band’s fans, who call themselves The Herd, are a dedicated bunch, even starting a charitable fundraising organization, Side To Side Charities, in 2002.
“A lot of fans show up at a lot of the gigs, and we’ve gotten to know them and recognize them,” Nevins said.
Self-organized, The Herd is quite active, she said, and several websites have been created to help fans keep in touch with one another.
The band’s own website, Facebook page and Twitter account also keeps those interested up-to-date with photos and commentary from recent shows as well as any other pertinent information.
For instance, the band recently posted on its Facebook page that it will be included in “JAMerica,” a documentary and book project by Peter Conners and Denver Miller that focuses on the genre’s emergence and growth.
Nevins said band members will meet with the project’s organizers in the next two weeks to discuss details.
And that’s not all that’s on the band’s plate. In the midst of a busy touring schedule, Donna the Buffalo will head to Nashville in the next couple of months to record another album, more than two years after its latest effort “Silverlined.” And in April, Nevins’ solo album “Wood and Stone” will debut. Both albums are set for release on Sugar Hill Records.
While the band’s schedule can be hectic, Nevins said finding time to rest, get some good food on the road and take care herself helps. And a positive perspective can’t hurt either.
“Everybody is really busy doing whatever they do,” she said. “We’re no different. If you love what you do, that’s an advantage to anyone.”

Fun Herd related sites:

 

 

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Photo by Jon Leidel

Really excited that The Bob Moog Foundation has officially released the Moog/ Toubab Krewe Documentary. It is an amazing film, and received the award for “Best Documentary” at Music Video Asheville last winter. My dearly departed friend Margaret Lauzon took a  lead role in making this film happen along with Flying Pig Studio’s David Bragg; it was the last film the she worked on before she passed; and it is fantastic. Here is what the Moog Foundation has to say about the film:

Toubab Krewe’s One-of-a-Kind Connection to Bob Moog through the Network of Creativity

They are such damn good musicians that I just wish I could dance with Ileana to their music” Bob Moog speaking about Toubab Krewe in the month before his passing

On August 21, 2005, Bob Moog succumbed to an aggressive brain tumor. His passing touched legions of people around the world. In the month prior to his passing, Bob discovered the music of Toubab Krewe, an new, local african/rock fusion band who was, at the time, managed by Bob’s longtime friend Steven Heller. One sleepless night Bob listened to the band’s new self-titled CD over and over again, and was deeply moved by the quality of the musicianship. This beautiful video, which features Drew Heller, guitarist for Toubab Krewe and Michelle Moog-Koussa, Executive Director of the Bob Moog Foundation, explores Bob’s connection to the band and the reach of the Moog Legacy as it has touched Toubab Krewe and as it is manifested in the Bob Moog Foundation.

We owe a huge thanks to many people who helped make this video a reality. The video was shot in the studio of world-class Echo Mountain Recording in Asheville, North Carolina. The owner, Steve Wilmans and their manager, Jessica Tomasin, continue to be a wonderfully supportive to the Foundation’s mission. The exceptional filmmaking team that donated their services to make this video a possibility was a collaboration between David Bragg of Flying Pig Studio (located within Echo Mountain Recording) and the late Margaret Lauzon of Studio South, among other local talents.

Music photographer phenom Jon Leidel documented the making of the video. Visit the original post of this on the Moog Foundations website to see them: http://moogfoundation.org/2010/voices-toubab-krewes-connection-to-bob-the-moog-legacy/

The dedication at the end of the film has brought tears to me: “Dedicated to Margaret Lauzon (1975-2010). Whose passion & dedication to local music was the driving force for bringing this video and many others to life. Her legacy will continue to connect lives and inspire creativity” ♥ Love.

Bob Moog will live forever in the music that he has inspired across this world. Asheville just got a little taste of that in the hugely successful Moogfest this past Halloween weekend in Asheville.

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Alissa Whelan, of Bright Life Photography, presents LIVE LOVE LEAF, a playful 2-part photography exhibit  comprised of portraits taken at the Lake Eden Arts Festival (LEAF) Photo Booth and documentary photographs taken during Leaf in Schools & Streets (LSS) Music and Art classes.   The show will be on display in the cafe at Greenlife throughout the month of October.  An opening reception will be held on Tuesday, October 5th from 6-8 PM and will feature hors d’oeuvres and a craft beer & wine tasting.  50% of works sold will be donated to LSS.

http://www.brightlifephotography.com/photoboothmay2010/slideshow

http://www.brightlifephotography.com/letthechildrenplay/slideshow

You can also find this event on Facebook

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My dear dear friend Margaret Lauzon passed away a couple of weeks ago. We had worked together on LAAFF and Music Video Asheville; and we hung out a lot talked about music, film, asheville, dogs, health, careers, men… you name it. She was always an inspiration to me in so many ways, and still is. Margaret is a true friend and I will always remember her dearly. She is already so missed by all that knew her… LOVE! Please visit her YouTube Channel and Check out some of her films http://www.youtube.com/user/meglauzon.

Also, please feel free to leave a comment and share your story of Margaret 🙂 She truly did bring a lot of people together, some of whom are just now starting to get to know each other…

Photo montage our friend Jenny Greer

Several of Meg’s friends including Jessica Thomasin, Jenny Greer, Michelle Moog, Christina Aurea, David Bragg, Steve Wilmans, Woody Wood, Ryan Grant, Jake Frankel amongst others got together in person, over the phone and via email to plan an Asheville memorial service for her. We asked a local writer and friend of Margaret’s, Rebecca Sulock, to help us write something up special to remember her. I know Rebecca had a difficult time with the writing of this, but it is absolutely beautiful and much appreciated!!!

In Loving Memory of Margaret Lauzon 1975-2010

“Just cause you’re not present, doesn’t mean you’re not here.”

Margaret wrote that in a November 2008 blog.

Margaret as "Butterfly Jones" with our good Friend Rhoni Sampson

Margaret Lauzon isn’t present here for her 35th birthday, on September 18th, 2010, but she’s surely still here:  Laughing until the furniture falls over (as Dan Ingenthron put it), surprising passersby with the fart machine on downtown streets (as Jessica Tomasin recounts), dancing in a giant afro wig as Butterfly Jones. Radiating a 100-watt smile. Her spirit and flair and passion are too strong to not be here. To borrow from e.e. cummings, we carry her heart in our hearts.

She’s remembered not just as a passionate, driven woman with incredible talent, and not just as a woman who made things happen — a woman who was “assertive but eloquent,” according to her friend Erin Scholze. The girl worked hard.

She’ll be remembered as a clever wit, an effervescent, talkative spirit and a gal who had her own way of talking about the world. Her way happened to be wicked sharp and cracked people up.

Meg and Jessica Thomasin at Film Awards

“She was one of the funniest people I’ve ever met in my life,” says Tomasin.

She’ll be remembered, too, through the many projects she spearheaded: “Many were purely out of love for her work,” notes Jake Frankel, who watched Meg put in tireless effort on a short film for Toubab Krewe. She drove by herself to Florida and Chapel Hill, just to get the footage she needed for the project. The project had its share of challenges, and Margaret tackled and beat every one: The film turned out to be incredible.

Meg with Chusy, Bragg & Brandon at Sundance

Lauzon had been working on a documentary on the Asheville music scene for years called “My Life Rocks”. She lives in the hours of band footage she shot, in the Studio South sessions with local musicians, in the side-splitting “Tear of the Beest” and in the other work that she produced with Villasonica.

She’d also been filming pieces on her experience with cancer. She chronicled doctors and treatments, and worked to make use of that struggle, even while it weakened her. That’s how tough she was, and how industrious. And even in sickness, Margaret had the strength to be a support to others who were struggling.

And through it all, she still laughed.

Her laughter doesn’t stop, just because she’s not present. She’s still here, and always will be. A spirit that strong doesn’t fade.

“She inspired me so much,” says Scholze, and that’s true of a whole lot of people.

We are hosting memorial service and Meg’s 35th Birthday Throwdown for her friends and family this Saturday at the API studio of Echo Mountain. Here are some of the details:

Margaret Lauzon was a unique spirit. She was passionate about local music and film: She worked with events and musicians through her Villasonica production company, she helped found Music Video Asheville, she served on the LAAFF music committee for several years, her Studio South productions captured local musicians in action, and she was working on a full-length documentary on the Asheville music scene. She helped produce one of the best films to ever come out of Asheville’s 48 Hour Film Project: Tear of the Beest. That’s just to list a few.

Lauzon died recently after a two-year bout with cancer. On Saturday, people will gather at Echo Mountain’s API studio to celebrate her life. It’s open to the public — there were lots of people in town who she worked with, who she filmed, who she advocated for and who she made laugh. A lot. Woody Wood, Jenny Greer and others will play music at the event, and some of Lauzon’s films will be shown.

The Margaret Lauzon Memorial & Birthday Throwdown will be Saturday, Sept. 18, at Echo Mountain API studio (second floor), 175 Patton Avenue. 5-9 p.m. Info at 232-4314 ext. 300. Here’s a link to the event on Facebook. Here is a link to her obituary.

My alltime favorite photo of Margaret with my Gracie who passed away this January of canine cancer

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PhilanthroPEAK Live starts at 5pm tonight, Saturday March 20th, 2010 at the Diana Wortham Theatre in Asheville! Film, Music, Art, Mon-profits, and more… Read more about it n the Blue Banner Article below:

Charity promotes nonprofits with film

By Alex Hammond / Staff Writer

UNCA’s Blue Banner www.thebluebanner.net

rahammon@unca.edu

The PhilanthroPEAK Live concert at the Diana Wortham Theatre involves several bands, cameras, a cut rate for students and filming a unique documentary.

“This year, Chris’ idea originally was to develop a film that would show us building relationships in the community, as we’re trying to develop a program in Asheville,” said Kaleem Clarkson, the director of Concepts4Charity.

C4C is a national charity dedicated to the promotion of other charities. Their next production is the PhilanthroPEAK documentary, which deals largely with area nonprofit organizaitions and the artists and musicians involved with them, said Chris Gaspar, the vice president of operations of C4C.

“We’re like a PR company for nonprofits,” he said.

Asheville has a lot of nonprofits, but little in terms of promotion for them, Gaspar said. Filming a documentary on those organizations seemed like a perfect chance to build relationships and to promote an area that gets less media coverage than it should, he said.

“I thought that this place is not really getting covered,” Gaspar said. “We want to introduce Asheville to a larger base.”

Gaspar wants to build another office here, Clarkson said, so they started production and started raising funds to move a pilot program from Massachusetts to the mountains.

“He (Gaspar) felt that it was time to build a physical presence in Asheville. Most of our physical presence has been in Massachusetts and Sacramento,” Clarkson said.

Funds raised at the concert Saturday will go toward a program starting at Asheville High School named Hip-Hop Culture, Gaspar said.

“We basically pick a benefactor, we work with the local talent and the local venues,” Gaspar said.

Clarkson said the program offers several disciplines, including break dancing, poetry or songwriting.

“What we do with Hip-Hop Culture, plain and simple, is we provide kids the chance to select a discipline. They practice that discipline twice a week after school,” Clarkson said.

Students learn the history of hip-hop as well as the techniques. At the end of the semester, they participate in a talent show, according to Clarkson.

“We got the confirmation from the principal that we could start a pilot program,” he said.

One of the filmmakers involved with the PhilanthroPEAK project, David Bourne, is a local who worked with Gaspar on a prior project, A Call to Action. He said the documentary is well on the way to finishing shooting.

“We’re still in production, so we are probably about three-quarters of the way through the project. We’ve filmed in a cabin in Leicester and we have filmed in a hot-air balloon,” Bourne said. “In my balloon, I was interviewing a naturalist who works for a regional nonprofit called the WNC Alliance, and he was able to talk about the region’s biodiversity.”

The unique shooting situation caused some equally unique problems, Bourne said.

“The major challenge was doing an interview when the balloon had to be inflated at different intervals. The balloon blast would go off, and we would just have to have them repeat the last thing they said, just start over,” he said.

Filming in a balloon was a way the filmmakers offered a different take on the area, Bourne said.

“Of course, being up in a balloon you get all kinds of perspective that you can’t get on the ground,” he said.

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.thebluebanner.net/mobile/charity-promotes-nonprofits-with-film-1.1270081

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