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Posts Tagged ‘Dogwood Alliance’

Join us for, “I LIKE IT WILD”, Asheville’s night of celebration for people who love and protect the world’s forests. Josh Phillips Folk Festival, Asheville Horns, and Moses Atwood are all set to play a benefit for Environmental Paper Network, on Wednesday, April 18th, 2012 at the Asheville Music Hall. There will be some incredible raffle prizes as well including local bands’ cd’s, a Skate PhD skate board, gift certificates to restaurants, massage, guided hikes, Lazoom, Ghost Tours, beautiful artwork and jewelry, and more!
The Environmental Paper Network is an international coalition of advocacy groups working together to change what’s in your paper.  Based in Asheville, they working to leverage the purchasing power of the world’s biggest brands, motivating them with both carrots and sticks, to buy paper products that are more responsible and sustainable for people and for our planet.  Groups like Greenpeace, WWF, Rainforest Action Network, NRDC and the National Wildlife Federation are part of the Environmental Paper Network.  Their Network also includes local groups doing amazing work right here in town, like the Dogwood Alliance, Clean Water for North Carolina, and Wild South.

Our community here in Asheville is full of people who are members of national and local conservation organizations and who by their donations and actions have been part of asking the world’s biggest brands by asking, “What’s In Your Paper?”  I Like It Wild is a meet-up and celebration of all that we have accomplished together to change the world. It’s also an opportunity to build community and meet new people, because right now there’s urgent work to be done to fight climate change and stop deforestation.

“I hope everyone who is a member of an environmental group, whether its Greenpeace, NRDC, the National Wildlife Federation, or local groups like Dogwood Alliance and Wild South, or anyone who loves to protect the environment will come out to WILD.” says local musician Josh Phillips. “It’s going to be extremely amazing event, with fun and radical people, great raffle prizes donated by local businesses, some of Asheville’s most talented musicians and a cool, multimedia rainforest theme.”

2012 is a year of real urgency, there’s only 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild, and destructive paper production practices are driving them to extinction.  The world is rallying to save endangered species and places on the verge of disappearing forever, and Asheville is a central headquarters of that global movement key part of that organizing.

We are very lucky to have the talents of some incredible musicians, Moses Atwood and his band, The Asheville Horns and Josh Phillips Folk Festival to help us party properly, so please come out and celebrate Earth Day, celebrate the world’s forests, hang out with people who want to protect them and have a ridiculous amount of fun.  Come out and support the work of your favorite environmentalists while getting down to the sweet sounds!

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Details at a Glance:

“I Like It Wild!”
Wednesday, April 18th
Asheville Music Hall

Featuring Music by:
Josh Phillips Folk Festival, Asheville Horns, Moses Atwood and his Band

All Ages
Doors at 8pm, Music at 9pm
$10 for admission, $5 and $10 raffle tickets
31 Patton Avenue
Asheville NC 28801

www.environmentalpaper.org

Find the event on Facebook

Learn more about Environmental Paper Network’s mission at: environmentalpaper.org

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Check out this great writeup of the inagural All Go West Festival in Asheville by the Mountain Xpress:

Let’s All Go West

The most fun part of town gets a new festival

by Alli Marshall in Vol. 16 / Iss. 39 on 04/21/2010 Mountain Xpress

When Jimmy Hunt relocated from Boone to West Asheville, he noticed a void. “That’s the part of town I live in. That’s where all my buddies live. That’s where I go out and have dinner and beer and walk my dog.” he says. “But there was no big festival.”

It’s a vacuum that comes and goes. West Asheville has been home to a number of music and arts street parties, such as the now-defunct West Fest, a short-lived turn with Fiesta Latina, and holidays-related gallery and boutique crawls. But Hunt — who started Music on the Mountaintop, an ecologically minded large-scale music festival in Boone three years ago — felt like what his new neighborhood needed was a local festival to call its own.

It was at Music on the Mountaintop that Hunt, who manages indie-rock band Do It To Julia, met Arieh Samson, who manages Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band. Samson had been considering producing a funk festival in downtown Asheville; when he and Hunt brainstormed, All Go West Festival (to be held in West Asheville behind the Rocket Club and in front of Harvest Records) was born.

The event, which Hunt describes as “having multi-facets: music, art and beer” brings together some of the best of what the area has to offer. West Asheville, according to Hunt “is so friendly and has that hip scene. We’re going around to every business and saying, ‘This is what we have to offer. How can we pair up?'”

The result, for the inaugural year, is a collection of interactive nonprofit booths (plus, a portion of the proceeds from All Go West benefits the Dogwood Alliance), a Kidz Zone, food and a group of about 15 local artists, as well as music happening on two stages.

The bands, for this first festival, were hand-picked by Hunt and Samson. “We selected the bands based on what we’ve been digging the past couple of months,” says Samson. “I’ve been in the scene for five years now, and have fantasized about a festival. I knew what bands I’d start with.”

The culmination of playlists and fantasy rosters resulted in the Booty Band and Do It To Julia, of course, but also pop group stephaniesid, steel-pan fusion act Jonathan Scales Fourchestra, eclectic newgrass/rock outfit Brushfire Stankgrass, live-electronica bands RBTS WIN and Marley Carroll & The Melanaster Band, folk duo Underhill Rose, jazz/rock project The Archrivals, indie-folk groups Kovacs & The Polar Bear and Uncle Mountain, jazz-jam act Vertigo Jazz Project, indie-rockers If You Wannas, Voodoo Wedding and Open Windows, and Americana group Tennessee Jed Band.

“We really like this town so much that we just wanted to embrace it,” Samson says. “Instead of booking national acts, we’re giving back to the bands here that have been paying their dues.”

“We wanted to touch on every type of music that’s represented in Asheville,” Hunt says. Some genres (say, classical and world beat) aren’t on the list, but indie rock — often neglected at festivals in favor of crowd-pleasing funk and jam — makes its presence known. “One of our goals with this festival was to touch on the emerging music. There’s a new indie folk-rock scene coming out of Asheville right now,” Hunt points out.

And while festival-goers are sampling, there’s All Go West’s Asheville craft beer tasting from 12 to 3 p.m. While that particular aspect of the event is ticketed, it’s a great chance to pick favorites and check out new offerings. “The beer tasting was an idea I took from Blues & Brews,” Hunt says of the Telluride Festival. But — like the approach the All Go West organizers took with the bands — they decided to stay local in scope. “This event is all about staying local,” Hunt says

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.mountainx.com/ae/2010/042110lets_all_go_west

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