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Posts Tagged ‘Heartache or Bust’

TaylorMartin-PhotoByScottWoody2 Taylor Martin’s Album Release Celebration at Isis on Sat, Jan 10, 2015
8:30 PM show/ 5pm doors; $8 Advance / $10 At the Door
General Admission Seated Show :: Limited Tables Available with Dinner Reservations.
There will also be theater-style & balcony seating and standing available on a first come first serve basis

Isis Music Hall
828-575-2737
743 Haywood Road Asheville, NC 28806
http://isisasheville.com/events/taylor-martin-cd-release-celebration/

Taylor Martin’s Album Heartache or Bust Features Stuart Duncan, Cody Kilby, Aaron Ramsey & more
Honest and Raw Tales of Love, Barroom Nights & Heartache
Overlaid Onto a Tapestry of Stringed Instruments along with B3 Hammond, Drums & Horns

For the past ten years in Asheville’s own Taylor Martin has been one of the area’s premier singer-songwriters. His raspy, emotion filled voice is instantly recognizable and his lyrics have an unflinching sincerity. Taylor has released a new record — Heartache or Bust — featuring Grammy winning artists Stuart Duncan and Cody Kilby as well as members of bluegrass supergroup, Mountain Heart.

To recreate these recordings in a live setting as Taylor Martin’s Acoustic Band, Martin has assembled some of the finest instrumentalist in Western North Carolina. The Indomitable Lyndsay Pruett on fiddle, bluegrass ninja Drew Matulich on mandolin, and Rick Cooper (of The Honeycutters) on upright bass. They will be performing at Isis Music Hall in Asheville on Saturday, Jan 10, 2015 to celebrate the release of Heartache or Bust. Joining the band as special guest for the evening are also Josh Milligan (The Honeycutters) on drums, as well as other special guests. “Taylor’s songwriting and taste in good music definitely add strength to the reputation the Asheville area has for having one of the best music scenes in the country. Heartache Or Bust has got some great new songs on it” says WNCW’s Martin Anderson.

“After 2009’s Engine, I wanted to put out an album which would contain material that had a chance to mature through live performances.” Taylor Martin goes on to say, “The songs were coming fast and I wanted the recording to happen with the same intensity. With the help of my co-producer and engineer Eric Willson (Omni Records), I was able to gather some of my favorite local and national musicians and lay down the initial tracks in Echo Mountain Studio while they were feeling new and very inspired.” Much of the album was  recorded at Omni Artist Studios where the album was mastered and there is also one live track mixed in. There is one cover on the album “Once in a While” and was sung by Taylor’s grandfather Jack Baldwin. He recorded his vocals and piano in the late 1940s and Taylor decided to add some the instruments that would have been typically used in his day.

heartache_600-410x410In the release of Heartache or Bust, Taylor Martin has created a wonderfully written, beautifully played, and well-recorded mix of fresh original music. All twelve tunes are played by some of the finest, most cutting edge musicians in acoustic music today — Stuart Duncan on fiddle, Cody Kilby (Ricky Skaggs) on acoustic and electric guitars, and Aaron Ramsey (Mountain Heart) on bass guitar, bouzouki, banjo, mandolin and dobro. The album also features tracks with Acoustic Syndicate’s Jay Sanders on bass; John Gardner on drums (James Taylor, Don Williams); Josh Shilling on B3 hammond, piano, and vocals; Drew Matulich on guitar; as well as wonderful vocalists, Molly Cherryholmes and Rorey Carroll amongst other musicians.

Even with all that studio musician prowess, the recording avoids the common pitfalls of “music business slickness” and “corporately modified arrangements.” While the songs are simple, they’re not simplistic. Engaging melodies, lyrics, bass guitar lines, and sonic choices allow the songs to breathe and maintain their evident roots influences of folk-rock and newgrass, and are topped off with the sweet singer-songwriter delivery of Martin’s adept vocals. This record covers a wide range of emotions and tells a story throughout to give the listener something new to hear with each track.

The sound is big but never loud, an almost living room rock ensemble that could fill both a small club and large theatre; a sonic balance hard to achieve in an acoustic ensemble with drums, yet they’ve done it. That the music is played together in ensemble fashion creates a kind of mountain-top chamber orchestra feel to some of the tunes. Martin’s singing is about the song. His voice is tender, vulnerable, and honest in nature, never losing the “eye contact” in his vocal delivery, a quality that is his hallmark throughout the recording. Acclaimed banjoist, Jeff Mosier, calls the album “one of the most fresh, organic, and original collections…I have heard in a long time…”

The lyrics are modern, yet firmly rooted in the deep traditions of Martin’s extended Southern heritage. Though you can hear the influences of early pioneers like Bill Monroe, the music is definitely one of the most fresh, organic, and original collections of songs and arrangements that I have heard in a long time. It represents to me what is still yet to come from the ever growing world of new acoustic, progressive, and alternative Americana. Taylor Martin will make his mark with this terrific work of original acoustic music. Taylor Martin says the album is ,”an invaluable lesson in songwriting: rely more on personal experience than on imagination….it was a real artistic awakening for me.”

For more about Taylor Martin, please visit www.TaylorMartin.org

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