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Posts Tagged ‘History’

Join Lingua Musica LIVE at The Showroom in Spartanburg at 8pm Tuesday, November 30th!

Joe Kendrick will be talking with Paul RiddleJoe BennettDavid Lee and Jason Perlmutter about the history of music in the Upstate, Piedmont and its impact on the world up to the present day. The  conversation will also cover the topic of about out of print and rare vinyl, as well as LPs in the context of analog recording and instruments.

Spartanburg’s own The Antibodies perform songs in between the topics of conversation with The Pulse dancers as well as a set after Lingua Musica concludes at 9pm.

Lingua Musica streams live to the internet and takes live audience comments as well as through online viewers via the website and twitter.

Here’s a bit more info about the folks involved, click on their images to find out more:

The Antibodies and the Pulse Dancers

The Antibodies show is like none other that you’ve seen before with music, dance and visuals — think ‘Pulp Fiction’ meets James Bond,” Showroom Director Stephen Long said in an email to the Herald Journal. The Antibodies consists of vocalist Tom Conder, Kevin Jameson on bass, Lee Holroyd on drums and Mark Branyon on guitar. Their influences are diverse, from The Clash to Ravi Shankar to Hank Williams Sr.

David Lee

David Lee

David Lee was born in Shelby, North Carolina in 1936. In his teenage years, he took up guitar, piano, and poetry. Soon David switched to songwriting and expanded his musical pursuits from there, wearing multiple hats on the local scene while working at the North Lake Country Club in Shelby for several decades. During this time, he launched the Washington Sound record store, founded three record labels–Impel, Washington Sound, and SCOP–and wrote songs and produced a plethora of local talent from R&B, to soul, to African American gospel, country, and pop. His biggest commercial success came in 1971 with his collaboration with Ann Sexton from Greenville, South Carolina. David wrote and produced her debut on Impel, with the great ballad “You’re Letting Me Down,” and it came to the attention of the famous DJ John R. in Nashville who picked it up for reissue on 77 Records. David’s legacy extends much farther than this one 45, as he put out 13 other singles and two albums on his various labels over the years. Paradise of Bachelors Records in Chapel Hill has recently released the first-ever retrospective of his important work, “Said I Had a Vision: Songs & Labels of David Lee, 1960-1988.”

Brendan Greaves, Ann Sexton and Jason PerlmutterIn 2002, while a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jason Perlmutter began collecting local soul recordings from North and South Carolina. On campus, he also served as a disc jockey and station manager at WXYC-FM, the university’s student-run radio station. In 2005, Perlmutter founded the Carolina Soul website, which serves as a living encyclopedia dedicated to the celebration and rediscovery of soul music from the Carolinas. Later he researched and compiled the 2007/2008 Jazzman/Now-Again “Carolina Funk” release, worked on the North Carolina Arts Council African-American Music Trails project, and co-founded the Paradise of Bachelors reissue record label. Over the years he has also disc jockeyed soul music at spots throughout the Carolinas as well as in Virginia, Washington, DC, and New York City.

Paul Riddle

Drummer Paul Riddle was with the Marshall Tucker Band from 1973 – 1983. He was heavily influenced by Buddy Rich and his jazz styling were unique to a rock and roll band and heavily contributed to their unique style of music. He still lives in Spartanburg where he owns a drum stick company, The Carolina Stick Company, and teaches lessons. He occasionally sits in with the Allman Brothers Band and plays in a local band called Throbber.

Joe Bennett
Joe Bennet was the lead guiratist of 1950’s Rock n Roll group based out of Spartanburg, The Sparkletones, whose story should have been a movie. For a lot of listeners, they were and are what rockabilly music was really all about — four kids from the south, none older than 16 and one as young as 13 when they started, getting together and making fast, sometimes raunchy sounds, literally the soundtrack to their own teen years, and having a lot of fun and getting an adventure out of it. Their music at its best sounded as freewheeling as their approach to it really was, and they were rewarded in October of 1957 with a number 17 placement on the Billboard charts for the only record they ever did chart, “Black Slacks.”

Joe Kendrick
Lingua Musica springs from Joe Kendrick‘s love of music and the spoken word, and is the culmination of his work as a radio host and business owner along with his love of journalism and music, its culture and history.

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Show details at a glance:
8pm, $5
828-669-0816
149 S.Daniel Morgan Ave., Suite 2
Spartanburg SC 29306
www.hub-bub.com/showroom
www.linguamusicalive.com
www.twitter.com/linguamusica

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Larry Keel: Progressive Bluegrass

By Tricia Lynn Strader,  Shepherdstown, WV

Flatpicking guitar virtuoso Larry Keel likes to mix up all kinds of musical styles in his pursuit of progressive Bluegrass. He blends Bluegrass, Jimmie Hendrix or Jerry Garcia, jazz, classical, or George Jones into his versions of popular songs or original tunes. He and Adam Aijala from Colorado’s Yonder Mountain String Band plan to tear it up Wednesday night at Shepherdstown Opera House in a highly energetic acoustic performance—their only one in the region this year.

Keel and Aijala are on a tour of shows in the South East. Last year, their wild riffs and antics in their live shows were very popular out West

Photo by Bright Life Photography

Since he was a boy, Keel has played guitar and performed in various bands around the world. He’s worked with legends such as Tony Rice, Sam Bush, Vassar Clements, Jim Lauderdale, Peter Rowan, and Mark Vann to name a few.

At 18, he began a professional musical career by working for the Disneyland theme park in Tokyo, Japan. But that came after growing up in a musical family. “My father played banjo and guitar,” he says. “He taught my older brother Gary how to play. They were always playing even though they never had a touring band. Every weekend they’d play and have musician friends over.”

At eight years old, his brother bought him a guitar. “He saw I was itching to play. Ever since he bought it for me, I never laid it down. The guitar is always part of me.”

When he was younger, he listened to Flatts and Scruggs, Bill Monroe, and old country like Webb Pierce or George Jones. He says as a teen, he discovered Hendrix, Garcia, and all kinds of music.

“I love it all – bluegrass, country, jazz, reggae, classical. The other styles inspired me to learn different songs I liked.”

Keel started playing in different semi-professional situations like fiddlers conventions or community events. He paid his dues early, as a young player and teen. Then, lady luck began to strike.

“A friend of mine in Florida was playing and told me about an ad for musicians with Disneyland. He talked me into coming down to audition. We found a bass player, and formed a trio. After rehearsing for two weeks, we auditioned, and they gave us a deal with Disneyland in Tokyo.”

Larry and Jenny Keel. By James Mayfield.

He was 18. “It was an interesting learning situation. We played six half-hour shows six days a week for seven months. It really makes you get your chops down.”

Keel met Mark Vann and John Fowler in Fauquier County, VA., and started to explore progressive string music in their band, “Farmer’s Trust.”

They played the festival circuit in Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. Keel and friend Will Lee, son of Ricky Lee from Ralph Stanley’s band, formed Magraw Gap.

Keel says at that point, he and the musicians hadn’t quit their day jobs.

Mark Vann moved to Telluride, Colorado to join the ultra progressive electric Bluegrass band Leftover Salmon. He encouraged Keel to try playing at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. Keel entered and won first place in the guitar competition.

Magraw Gap did their first studio recording. The band won the 1995 band competition at Telluride.

“Telluride’s a great stepping stone, a good place for a musician to launch a career. There’s a lot of prestige with it. There are some high end musicians there, too. I was proud to be part of it.”

He was playing among the likes of John Hartford, Sam Bush (post-New Grass Revival) and Bill Monroe at Telluride to name a few.

Other musicians of note began using Keel or his band as supporting musicians. He formed The Larry Keel Experience in 2000 with fellow musicians Will Lee and Jason Krekel. He says the name came from the various incarnations of the band, sometimes a trio, foursome, or whatever. To date, he has recorded 10 of his own self-produced projects, most recently two with his ensemble Natural Bridge which includes wife Jenny. He has collaborated on several projects with Keller Williams’ Keller and the Keels and collections of guitar-oriented projects released by Flatpicking Guitar Magazine. Del McCoury and Acoustic Syndicate have recorded his original material. His “Mountain Song” was on Del McCoury Band’s 2005 Grammy-winning The Company We Keep. He was part of a documentary in 2004 called “Larry Keel: Beautiful Thing.” In 2004, he and his brother Gary released “Keel Brothers.”

In his teaming for this tour with Adam Aijala, Keel says Aijala and his band Yonder Mountain come from a dissimilar background, one of punk, rock and metal. He says they play a popular tune to the younger crowd, then throw in a traditional Bluegrass tune, introducing a new generation to the genre.

“He grew up in Boston and takes a whole different approach to acoustic guitar. The last five or six years they’ve been opening the eyes of young people to their Bluegrass. The show is me and Adam on two guitars. We do original songs and some pretty diverse covers to keep it interesting. It’s very high energy. And we like audience participation.”

Keel says he plays everything and uses a Bluegrass band to do it. He says a song may have jazz or reggae mixed in it. He’s got a list of 1,000 ready tunes to pick from.

Show Information:
Larry Keel and Adam Aijala
Wednesday, May 5th
7:30 doors open; Performance 9 p.m.
Shepherdstown Opera House
131 W. German Street
Shepherdstown, WV
Tickets: $20. 304-876-3704

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