Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘jam band’

Photo by Melissa Colombo

JUST ANNOUNCED: A NEW YEAR’S RUN
WITH SOLO SETS, KELLER & THE KEELS, AND KDUBALICIOUS,
SPECIAL GUESTS THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME,
KELLER PLAYS FOR KIDS MATINEES, AND MORE.

THE DEBUT OF THE TRAVELIN’ MCCOURYS FEATURING KELLER WILLIAMS –
AT MAGNOLIA FEST, VOODOO MUSIC FESTIVAL AND ELSEWHERE THIS FALL

KELLER RELEASES BASS –
HIS 17TH RECORDING, AND HIS FIRST PLAYING ONLY BASS GUITAR –
IN DECEMBER 2011

Since Keller Williams first appeared on the scene in the early ’90s, he has helped define the term independent artist. Looking at the diversity of his fall plans, you can certainly ascertain why. Look for Keller on tour through the end of the year in several of his various incarnations, including his newest collaboration – The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams – debuting this fall at Magnolia Fest, Voodoo Music Festival, and others. Also announced today, a New Year’s run: beginning December 28 at The Lincoln Theatre in Raleigh, North Carolina. Then on December 29 and 30 the show rolls to The National in Richmond, VA and Norfolk’s NorVa respectively, with Keller Williams on stage for one set solo and one set with his project Kdubalicious, plus very special guests The Pimps of Joytime. For New Year’s Eve, Keller & The Keels ring in 2012 at Brooklyn Performing Arts Center in Wilmington North Carolina. All four venues will also host a Keller Plays for Kids matinee performance earlier that day. Visit kellerwilliams.net for information and tickets.

Also in December, Keller Williams releases his 17th recording, Bass, which is also Keller’s first-ever release playing only bass guitar. The lineup – dubbed Kdubalicious for live shows – features Keller on bass, Jay Starling on keyboards, and Mark D on drums. Additional details on the release of this reggae/ dub/ funk delight will be announced soon.

Brought together by equal parts mutual admiration and the desire to change the musical landscape while staying true to their roots, The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams are a perfect – albeit unexpected – fit. The two have a lot in common after all: their high energy, ever-evolving live shows, their individual playing prowess, and their strong and unique song writing skills. It’s a perfect marriage of instrumental virtuosos, memorable songwriting, infectious musical camaraderie, and undeniable energy. And with both acts known to bring epic and spontaneous live collaborations to theaters and festivals across America – The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams will take this collaborative spirit one step further, promising to bring something fresh and unexpected to the live stage.

Long considered one of the most unique and prolific live performers, Keller Williams brings his signature joyful spontaneity and infectious good humor to another of his recent incarnations: Keller Plays For Kids. A standout at Lollapalooza’s much-buzzed about “Kidzapalooza” and a favorite Super Music Friend on Yo Gabba Gabba! Tour, Keller Plays For Kids heads into theatres in a handful of select markets this fall, including Washington DC, Brooklyn, and others. See below for Keller Plays for Kids details. Check out this Keller Plays for Kids feature on HDNet Movies KidScene: http://kellerwilliams.net/kids

The current list of confirmed dates is as follows:
Saturday, September 24 – Sunday, September 25 Life Is Good Festival Boston MA KIDS show
Thursday, October 6 Harro East Ballroom Rochester NY
Friday, October 7 Westcott Theater Syracuse NY
Saturday, October 8 The Egg Albany NY KIDS show
Saturday, October 8 The Egg Albany NY
Saturday, October 15 Utopiafest Utopia TX
Friday, October 21 Magnolia Music Festival Live Oak FL The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams
Saturday, October 22 9:30 Club Washington D.C. KIDS show
Saturday, October 22 9:30 Club Washington D.C.
Friday, October 28 Madison Theater Covington KY Deloween with Keller Williams, The Del McCoury Band, and The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams
Saturday, October 29 Jefferson Center Roanoke VA Deloween with Keller Williams, The Del McCoury Band, and The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams
Sunday, October 30 Voodoo Music Festival New Orleans LA The Travelin’ McCourys Featuring Keller Williams
Thursday, November 3 – Friday, November 4 The Pour House Charleston SC
Saturday, November 5 Georgia Theatre Athens GA
Thursday, November 10 Blind Pig Ann Arbor MI
Friday, November 11 Newport Music Hall Columbus OH
Saturday, November 12 Beachland Ballroom & Tavern Cleveland OH
Friday, November 18 Stone Pony Asbury Park NJ
Saturday, November 19 Brooklyn Bowl Brooklyn NY KIDS show
Wednesday, November 30 – Thursday, September 1 The Abbey Theatre Durango CO
Friday, December 2 El Rey Theatre Albuquerque NM
Saturday, December 3 Orpheum Theater Flagstaff AZ
Sunday, December 4 Hard Rock Cafe Las Vegas NV
Thursday, December 8 Infinity Hall Norfolk CT
Wednesday, December 28 Lincoln Theatre Raleigh NC KIDS Show
Wednesday, December 28 Lincoln Theatre Raleigh NC with Kdubalicious
Thursday, December 29 The National Richmond VA KIDS show
Thursday, December 29 The National Richmond VA w/ Kdubalicious and The Pimps of Joytime
Friday, December 30 The Norva Norfolk VA KIDS show
Friday, December 30 The Norva Norfolk VA with Kdubalicious and The Pimps of Joytime
Saturday, December 31 Brooklyn Performing Arts Center Wilmington NC with Kdubalicious and Keller & The Keels
Saturday, December 31 Brooklyn Performing Arts Center Wilmington NC KIDS show
Monday, January 9 – Saturday, January 14 Jam Cruise 10 Fort Lauderdale FL Keller & The Keels
Wednesday, March 14 – Saturday, March 17 Jam in the ‘Dam, The Melkweg Amsterdam NL

Look for Keller Williams’ complete list of fall tour dates at www.kellerwilliams.net.

Read Full Post »


Donna the Buffalo is on for a great weekend heading through Nashville, Greensboro, and Asheville. There are lots of great interviews for the shows which are posted below. Co-band leader, Tara Nevins, kicked of the day yesterday with a solo studio session on the Lightning  100 with Lt Dan. Then the band went over to the Loveless Barn for a Music City Roots performance with other amazing artist including  Catie Curtis, The Cleverlys, The Black Lillies, and Rayland Baxter. Check out some wonderful pics from the night here.

DtB will be playing on Cannery Street tonight in Nashville at the Mercy Lounge with the Roy Jay Band, who is on the road with DtB for several shows this winter. Here’s a nice writeup in the Nashville Scene by Edd Hurt about the show:

Photo by Jim Gavenus

Folkies with a superior sense of rhythm are rare enough, but folkies with a good beat and a healthy disrespect for eclectic clichés are a national treasure. Hailing from the metropolis of Trumansburg, N.Y., Donna the Buffalo began playing their mixture of country, soul, zydeco and folk 20 years ago, and they’ve never sounded better. On their 2008 full-length Silverlined, songwriters Tara Nevins and Jeb Puryear came up with such great songs as “Biggie K,” which may be the finest tune ever written about childbirth: “Though her stomach’s stretched and pulled / She’s never been more beautiful.” The quintet’s easy way with American roots music suggests a fusion of Brinsley Schwarz and The Holy Modal Rounders, and they make music that’s beautiful but never prettified. They say they have a couple of projects in the works, including a full-band effort and a solo record by Nevins.  Read the original post at nashvillescene.com.

On Friday, January 28th, they head on over to Greensboro, NC to play at the new Blind Tiger. David McCracken, DtB’s B3 Hammond player, grew up in Greensboro and did this great interview with Eddie Huffman from GoTriad.com:

photo by Jim Gavenus

From the moment Greensboro native Dave McCracken first saw Donna the Buffalo play live, at MerleFest in 1997, he knew he belonged in the band.

“I watched them for the first time, and I remember I saw them move the organ across the stage,” McCracken says, speaking by phone from his mother’s house in Liberty. “I said out loud, ‘Man, that should be me.’ Ten years later — 10 years later! — it’s me. I swear, I don’t even know how that happened. I just knew it should be me for some reason.”

. . .    . . .    . . .

Donna the Buffalo formed in 1989 in upstate New York but has made many N.C. connections in the years since — McCracken and North Wilkesboro’s MerleFest among them. The group signed with Sugar Hill Records, a fixture in Durham for more than two decades before the label moved its offices to Nashville, and the members of Donna the Buffalo founded the twice-yearly Shakori Hills Grassroots Festival of Music and Dance in rural Chatham County, now entering its eighth year.

. . .    . . .    . . .

Jam band fans already knew McCracken via Folkswaggin’, which started in Greensboro in 1994 and played at the Blind Tiger regularly.

“I really cut my teeth in that place,” he says. “That’s where I learned how to play keyboards. I’ve been playing there since ’97. I’ve gone through a lot of things in that place, and it means a lot to me. I’m looking forward to playing there again. It’s been a long time since I’ve been there.”

In recent years, McCracken has played at the Blind Tiger with Q-Bex, a version of the band Hobex which includes acclaimed drummer Jeff Sipe.

McCracken did a stint in Hobex about 10 years ago, and he played in a metal band called Perpetual Iniquity in Greensboro as a teenager in the late 1980s. But his musical ambitions go all the way back to his early childhood in the 1970s.

“Playing music for a living was seriously a dream I had when I was, like, 3,” McCracken says. “You know how Facebook reunites people so much? I reunited with somebody who was my friend until I was 5. He was like, ‘Wow, you’re playing music for a living.’ He said it wasn’t surprising at all because all I talked about back then was how I wanted to do it.”

. . .    . . .    . . .

Read the full article at gotriad.news-record.com

Tara Nevins also interviewed for the Blind Tiger show. She spoke with Laura Graff from the Winston-Salem Journal. Here is a bit of the article:

Photo by Lewis Tezak Jr

Donna the Buffalo’s music belongs on the festival circuit — it’s an engaging mix of roots, bluegrass, reggae, country and New Orleans-inspired zydeco. . .

. . .     . . .    . . .

“We just come from a base of traditional music,” said Tara Nevins, one of the band’s original members. Nevins formed the band with Jeb Puryear, and both play old-time fiddle.

“Over the years of playing fiddle music, we discovered other traditional music,” Nevins said. “We don’t do it on purpose, it’s just that we have a lot of music that we’ve been involved in over the years and that we love.”

Nevins, who started out playing the fiddle, bought an accordion about 20 years ago.

“That gave us a Louisiana flavor to our songs,” she said. “We just have a lot of musical influences, because of some of the different instruments we play, those flavors come out in our music.”

. . .    . . .    . . .

Nevins just finished work on a solo album, “Wood and Stone,” which will be released on Sugar Hill in April.”Wood and Stone” is her second solo album. The last, “Mule to Ride,” showcased the fiddle and was, Nevins said, more “old-time bluegrass.” This new album, she said, showcases her songwriting.

“I’ve written pretty much everything on the record,” Nevins said. “It’s not all about the fiddle the way the first one was.”

She said the band is planning to return to the studio in late February to work on a new album.

“It’s going to be a collaboration,” Nevins said. “We’re inviting other artists that we’ve played at with festivals over the years — artists we admire.”

Read the full article at www2.journalnow.com

On Saturday, the band jumps on the bus over to Asheville to play the Orange Peel. The Mountain Xpress wrote a nice little blurb about the show and some of DtB’s Asheville connections:

Kyle Spark. Photo by Lewis Tezak Jr.

For years, upstate N.Y.-based, self-desribed “Cajun/ zydeco, rock, folk, reggae and country” band Donna the Buffalo has long had an Asheville connection through it’s bassist. First it was Bill Reynolds (Band of Horses) then Jay Sanders (Acoustic Syndicate). Now DTB has Massachusetts bassist Kyle Spark but the group (who has toured for 21 years) still makes its semi-annual trek South (DTB is likely to pop up at regional warm-weather festivals). . .

Read the original post at: mountainx.com

Great weekend in store. We hope to see lots of the Herd around for these SouthEast shows!



Read Full Post »

Photo by Jim Gavenus

You may notice some people filming the Feb 11th Donna the Buffalo show at Water Street Music Hall in Rochester, NY. The band is being included in an exciting project called JAMerica which includes a book as well as a documentary film chronicling the emergence, rise, future, etc. of the jam band and festival scene.

The book portion will be written by Peter Conners (www.peterconners.com) who is author of Growing Up Dead: The Hallucinated Confessions of a Teenage Deadhead (Da Capo Press, 2009) and White Hand Society: The Psychedelic Partnership of Timothy Leary & Allen Ginsberg (City Lights, 2010). JAMerica will be published by Da Capo Press in fall 2013.

Conners is also working with filmmaker Denver Miller (www.denvermillerfilms.com) to turn JAMerica into a documentary film featuring interviews and live footage from festivals and shows. In addition to interviewing the band and filming the Feb 11th show, Conners and Miller will be conducting some spontaneous interviews with audience members at the show. This is your chance to share your love of DTB with the world!

Special thanks to David Gans for introducing us to Peter and Denver!

Here’s a video of DTB from the last time they played Water Street:


Read Full Post »

Below is an excerpt from Mousike Magazine about Keller Williams and his bluegrass project with Larry and Jenny Keel. It is a really in depth and long article on Keller musical influences and project. I have posted below  the paragraphs about Keller and the Keels.  For more on Keller Williams and his one man jam band, his Colorado connection, other fun side projects and more, please do check out the full original post here:  http://mousikemagazine.com/2010/12/biscuits-in-his-gravy-keller-williams/

Biscuits in his Gravy: Keller Williams

Written By Clay Hall

For many of you, Keller Williams needs no introduction. But for anyone left out there who hasn’t heard of Keller, seen his ledendary solo act or followed his many other incarnations, well… I guess I’ve got some ‘splaining to do. Yet how the hell do you write a quick intro about a guy who has just released his 16th album (his first geared towards children), hosts his own syndicated radio show, has five side-projects listed on his website, recently published his first children’s book and is currently touring with a three-piece bluegrass outfit to promote an album of cover songs from artists as diverse as Kris Kristofferson, Amy Winehouse and Marcy Playground? It’s been said that his “Entire career seems like a eries of side projects.” ….

THIEF

Photo by Melissa Colombo

The Keels is one of Keller’s more recent projects, but it could be said that it was 20-some years in the making. Keller began playing seriously with Larry and Jenny Keel in 2004, and in 2006 they teamed up for the bluegrass album not surprisingly titled GRASS, but their friendship and musical collaboration goes back to 1991 when they were all involved in the local Fredricksburg music scene. Larry was playing in a band called Fizzawah, a side-car to his main oufit McGraw Gap and Keller would sit in, and vice versa.

Though they lived a few hours apart in Virginia, it never kept them from getting together for an afternoon jam when they had the time, and Larry also had his own connections to Colorado in the newly formed Leftover Salmon’s original banjo player Mark Vann (a TBF winner himself). Keel and Vann had been friends since they first met in ’89 and formed a bluegrass outfit called Farmer’s Trust and in 1993 Vann convinced Larry to come out to Colorado for the Telluride Bluegrass Festival where Larry surprised even himself by winning the flatpicker’s contest. “I was completely surprised, because there was wonderful talent in the whole thing, you know. Just seeing all that and getting to take in Colorado was prize enough. It’s kept me coming back for years.” Keel says about the mountains and the music during that first visit.

And fortunate we are to have enjoyed those visits over the years. With an unofficial title of ‘Bluegrass Legend and Master Fisherman’, Larry is considered one of the best flatpickers on the planet. Steeped in the old-timey and with a gravelly voice as deep and rich as mooshine on a riverbank, it’s a nice complement to Williams’ smooth-as-silk delivery. Larry’s flat-picking style is as seamless as it is gymnastic and he’s a master at simulating banjo rolls, mandolin runs or even parts that you would normally hear played on a fiddle.

The bridge between Keller and Larry is provided by Larry’s wife Jenny on the upright bass. Born into the bluegrass tradition herself and a young enthusiast, Larry and Jenny met at a bluegrass festival and were soon playing together anywhere and everywhere they could.

The whole album couldn’t flow any better, managing to create a commonality and a cohesiveness to the scattershot playlist. On youtube I found videos of the trio playing songs from THIEF alongside the gentle Rappahannock river in Virginia and the chemistry between the three is captured perfectly. Keller leading the way, at times chopping hardwood, other times throwing in his fluid and almost a-rythmic rolls and fills. Larry charges up and down the neck with his unique style of rollicking flatpicking while the beautiful Jenny Keel ties it all together with her solid timing and gentle attack, sometimes drifting off with a wistful smile, but always keeping one eye on Keller and watching out for his surprises. These videos are a testament to the essence of bluegrass, the depth of their friendship, and that good warm feeling of fraternity that only bluegrass music and good whiskey can produce. It is obvious that these people have nowhere else to be, and nothing else they’d rather be doing than playing music together.

Speaking of their friendship and collaboration with Keller, Larry says, “I’ll tell ya’, he’s always amazed me with his creativity and his ideas and the directions he heads with all of his playin’ as far as not just your typical cover songs or his original material, he’s always got a surprise in there for ya’. His rythm capability is as good as it gets, it’s the best I know of and I just love playing music with him you know, it really fires me up. We tend to read each other like a book now, it’s pretty awesome.”

And when it comes to the diverse origins of the material, the legend from Natural Bridge, Virginia says, “You know with a lot of these songs off of THIEF, me not being the big radio listener of popular music, I hadn’t heard of any of the songs that were on the CD. It was hilarious, we rehearsed ‘em and got ‘em all down and had ‘em tight and then we go out to play these shows in front of thousands of people… and everyone’s singing the words to them. I feel like the odd man out in weird way, but we put our touch on ‘em and I’m real happy to be a part of it.”

It’s easy to get caught up in those cover songs, the diversity of the source material and the unlikliness of it all.  Pickin’ on the Butthole Surfers? Amy Winehouse on corn liquor rather than crack? And who the hell are the Presidents of the United States of America, anyway? But the reality is that this is damn good bluegrass from any angle, and as far as the art of taking other artist’s songs and making them your own while still allowing the songwriting to shine through on its own merits, it is brilliant. These folks are impeccable at playing these songs, without once ever getting in the way of the songs themselves, and I can only imagine that the original artists are delighted to see their material handled with such dexterity and humility.

When I ask Keller how they chose the material for the album, it becomes clear why the choices were so succesful. “You know, a handful of those songs were road tested by the Keels and I and we definitely played them live for a couple of years before we recorded them, so that was really easy to choose those. Others were road tested by me solo and then there were a few others that we put together right there in the studio that I thought were really cool. Like the Raconteurs song, the original is very rockin’… if you listen to the words it’s kind of like one of those old bluegrass murder ballads and it works really well bluegras. It was all about the songs I knew that people would either know and sing along to, or like even if they were hearing it for the first time.”

This album proves beyond doubt that digital technology can and does capture that analog magic, as long as the magic is there to begin with, and in my mind cements Keller Williams as an incredibly talented producer. The irony is that this album is anything but a ripoff. Though it may be other folks that writ the songs, each one is left improved upon, the paradox being that Keller, Larry and Jenny bring out each song’s hidden potential by stripping them down to volume, tempo and timbre. If Keller wasn’t stuck on one-word album titles he might as well have called this record “Pimp My Song – Mountaingrass Edition”.

READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE:  http://mousikemagazine.com/2010/12/biscuits-in-his-gravy-keller-williams/

Read Full Post »

Interview with Larry Keel at the Festy

by Diane Farineau

Author, Diane Farineau, is  researching & co-writing The Festival Project, a photo book project which features the combined works of photographers Chester SimpsonMilo Farineau
————————————————————————————————————————————————

One of the highlights at the Infamous Stringduster’s new Festival “The Festy” was a Sunday appearance by Larry Keel and Natural Bridge. The trio quickly became a quartet as they were joined on stage by guitarist and Larry’s brother, Gary. When asked if they played together a lot, Larry responded “It’s rare. But when we do festivals in the area, he comes out and does some picking with us, it’s always so fun! ”

After their rousing set, the band spoke with members of the press and then settled in to just hang out for a little bit. “Everyone’s just here to want to hang out for a bit, which we don’t get to do much” said Mark Shimick. “The Stringdusters will play a lot of traditional bluegrass festivals, where we play some jam band festivals, so we don’t get together that much so it’s nice to see
them.”

The band is known to end up picking in the parking lot on occasion, which they enjoy, and Larry explained; “when I started going to festivals/fiddlers conventions, that’s what it was all about, before being a performer at them it was about all our friends getting together, making a big ol’ pot of soup or something, playing a bunch of music all night and then all day, then playing all night again. That’s where you get your chops down, where you learn to play. It’s very special.” Jenny agreed “That’s a great place to go when you’re just learning, listening and absorbing and getting in to the pulse of it all, watching others, the old-timers, new-timers and everything in between, and then slowly you start picking yourself, it’s a great way to absorb it and take it further, if you want to or just enjoy it for what it’s worth. “

The band has had a busy but fun year, listing some of their highlights “we’ve had a wonderful season this year, Telluride, Grand Targhee, Music on the Mountaintop, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass in San Francisco was really awesome too, French Broad, Watermelon Park.”

I couldn’t resist asking for a fishing update as well, “I haven’t done as much of that as I’ve wanted to,” said Larry, “I did some out in Idaho, fly fishing. I fish every kind of way I can, I do a lot of bass fishing, I did some fishing in the Outer Banks this summer, some saltwater fishing. I caught a lot of bass in Georgia. Every chance I get, I go!”

I wondered what it was like to be on the road as a musical couple, Mark pointed out (and Larry agreed) “Jenny is the bedrock of the band, seriously, she takes care of a lot of stuff to let Larry have his creativity and she’ll let me know if I have something I need to do.” “We wouldn’t want it any other way,” explained Jenny, “we knew, one way or another, we wanted to work together
and be together, so here it is!”

When asked about the noticeable absence of a banjo in the group, Larry explained: “We had our banjo player for a while, he’s out in Colorado now, he’s restarted up his old band and we’re back to our trio that we’ve had for 10 years, and that’s our core part of the band but we have a few very special guests we like to bring in to make it a quartet. Today it was Nate Leath on the fiddle, which, he’s as great fiddler player as there is, really. We have quite a few special guests we like to get out, like Will Lee on the 5 string banjo, he’s a master and a wonderful singer too. We sort of switch it up, have trios, have a banjo or a fiddle, we like to mix it up. And I think our audience likes that. It keeps it fresh for them and it keeps it fresh for us.

When asked where their evening was headed, Larry smiled “I’m looking forward to picking with as many of these folks as I can, we don’t always get to hang out, so it’s sure nice when we do!”

Also, check out this article by Diane about the Festy itself: https://dreamspider.wordpress.com/2010/10/13/introducing-the-festy-experience/

Read Full Post »