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Posts Tagged ‘Mike Rhodes’

Asheville, NC’s Kellin Watson Performs “Chains of Love”
Live with Jam in the Van!

Check out More Jam in the Van at
http://jaminthevan.com
http://facebook.com/jaminthevan
http://twitter.com/jaminthevan

*** Video Credits ***
Artists: Kellin Watson
Director of Photography: Abran Rubiner
Recording Engineer: John Washington
Post Production by: Adam Weiss
Created & Produced by Jam in the Van, LLC
Music by: Kellin Watson
www.kellinwatson.com

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The Honeycutters Release NEW Album “When Bitter Met Sweet”

The Grey Eagle
Saturday, May 5th
Moses Atwood Opens
Doors 7pm, Show starts at 8pm
$8 adv/ $10 at door
185 Clingman Ave. 28801
828-232-5800

In a world that is becoming increasingly digitalized and impersonal, the Honeycutters are building a reputation based on live performance and songs that tend to stick with you. Fitting into Americana realm, Mountain Xpress’s Alli Marshall calls The Honeycutters’ sound, “Old school country in the truest sense… free of twang and ten-gallon hats but full of real emotion, family history, quick wit and strong liquor.”

In an interview with the Folk to Folk Blog, Amanda says that part of the Honeycutters appeal is that their sound harkens back to simpler, more honest times. “In times like these, people want something real,” she said. “They’re just really craving something that’s just going to connect them to that basic human pool of emotion.”

The Honeycutters are excited to introduce their second full length studio release, When Bitter Met Sweet on June 5th, 2012. They are hosting their Asheville CD release show at the Grey Eagle on Saturday, May 5th. Copies of the album will be available at the show. Moses Atwood opens the show, which starts at 8pm sharp. The Honeycutters will also be making an appearance on WNCW’s Studio B during the 11 o’clock AM hour on Thursday, May 3rd… tune in at http://wncw.org.

Like their first release, Irene, When Bitter Met Sweet features singer/songwriter Amanda Anne Platt, who has been hailed as “one of the best songwriters coming out of WNC these days” by WNCW programming director Martin Anderson. Peter James accompanies her on lead and rhythm guitar as well as harmony vocals. They are backed up by Tal Taylor’s signature mandolin playing, Ian Harrod on bass, and Jon Ashley on drums creating an original brand of Americana that has proved equally appealing to both the musician and the music lover, the country and the city, and the old and the young.

Platt’s songs are shaped by a raw honesty that comes straight from the heart and emits a sort of melancholy happiness. The album features 11 tracks that touch upon childhood and loss of innocence, finding a sense of belonging and one’s voice, truth, love and patience, traveling and embarking on new life-journeys (and the fears that go along with these), and the understanding that comes about when life’s circumstances come full circle.

The title track, “When Bitter Met Sweet” is a song about the end of love looking back at the beginning.  Platt says, “I think it’s important not to lose sight of what was good about something even if it is ending.” “For Eleanora,” was inspired after reading a biography of Billie Holiday and reflects on a similar thought of polarities that, “It seems like so often the partners of extreme talent and specialness are self-destruction and doubt.”

The song “90 Miles (The Tennessee Song)” is featured on Blue Ridge Outdoors Trailmix for 2012 Merlefest Artists. It was written after her first trip to International Folk Alliance in 2010, an event that can be quite overwhelming at first. An admitted introvert, Amanda was faced with the challenges of how to be heard amongst all of the activity of events such as these. And make herself heard is exactly what she went on to do; becoming a finalist at 2011 Merlefest’s Chris Austin songwriting contest for her song song “Little Bird” (unrecorded). She was asked to return as a guest judge for the contest, along with Jim Lauderdale, for the 2012 Merlefest (Where The Honeycutters will also be performing a few sets this year). The same song won first place in the Great Lakes Song Contest in February 2012.

“All I Got, ” is a song Amanda calls, “a love song I wrote a long, long time ago, before I had actually ever been in love” and was selected for WNCW’s 2010 Crowd Around the Mic Vol. 14.

“Fancy Car” features Platt’s father on harmonica. He also sits in on “Not Over Yet”  which she says that when she sings it she imagines a child leaving home for the first time, wanting freedom but scared of what it might cost.

When Bitter Met Sweet was co-produced by Amanda and Peter with the assistance of Aaron Price, and was recorded at Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, NC after securing funding through a successful Kickstarter campaign. Along with the full band, many special guests make appearances on the album including Matt Smith (pedal steel and dobro), Nicky Sanders (fiddle), Mark Platt (harmonica), Je Widenhouse (coronet), and on drums Mike Rhodes and Richard Foulk and for various songs. The album was engineered (and partially mixed) by Jon Ashley with the assistance of Julian Dreyer, mixed by John Keane and mastered by Dave Harris at Studio B Mastering in Charlotte, NC.

Their first full length studio release Irene, released in May 2009, has landed them in Ian Hughes’ NoDepression Podcast’s Top 20 of 2009, Fret Knot Radio Hour’s “Nine you need to know from ’09”, and #32 in WNCW’s listener voted Top 100 of 2009.

Since putting out Irene the Honeycutters have shared the stage with such Americana favorites as Tony Rice, The Greencards, Jill Andrews, The Steep Canyon Rangers, Donna the Buffalo, and The Seldom Scene.  They have been voted Western North Carolina’s favorite local Americana act (2011 Mountain Xpress reader’s poll) and delighted audiences from upstate New York to Seattle, Washington. They are currently touring around the release of When Bitter Met Sweet.

Stay tuned to thehoneycutters.com for more news about the album and their tour.

What the Press is saying about The Honeycutters:

“I can see a day when her name is mentioned alongside Lucinda Williams, Mary Gauthier and Gillian Welch.  She’s just that good.” —The Real Southern

***

“They’ve got a sound as classic as grits… I thought of those country songs that play on those diner jukeboxes you see in movies.” –Charlotte’s Creative Loafing

***

“Amanda Platt’s striking, timeless vocals form the cornerstone of her often heart-wrenching songs, while producer Pete James’ understated guitar and gentle harmonies round out the duo’s saccharine-sweet mix.” –Dane Smith, Mountain Xpress

***

“Amanda’s lyrics are both sardonic and sweet, which adds a contemporary element to their country twanged Americana sound [which] is more influenced by the harmonic tendencies of country singers like Johnny Cash and June Carter” —Folk to Folk Blog.

***

“I recommend the Honeycutters not only because they’re some of the best my hometown of Asheville, NC, has to offer. Their music embodies a very catchy, accessible, optimistic sort of spirit so frequently lacking in folk circles (where brooding, hyper-analytical music reigns supreme). What’s more, like Carolina Story, they’re a great band replete with tasty harmonies.” –Kim Ruehl, Folk Music About.com

***

“If anyone can make this old metalhead want to whip out the cowboy boots and hat, order a couple of Budweisers and spin my woman around the dance floor, the Honeycutters can.” –Brent Fleury, Bold Life Magazine

***

“Amanda’s voice sings like Carolina farmlands after a rainstorm” –Harvey Robinson, Monkeywhale productions

www.thehoneycutters.com

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written by Mike McWilliams.

This isn’t a Woody Wood album. This is Aaron Wood.

After years of going by “Woody,” a nickname given to him by a childhood friend, the 37-year-old rocker said  he’s decided to start using the name his real name on stage, and his new album, he hopes, is the first step toward forging his own identity and being true to himself.

“This album is me. It might be painful for me to listen to, or it might be painful for others to listen to because it’s sad, but this is who I am, and I want to make sure for the rest of my life that I don’t run away from that,” Wood said before a recent gig at the Lexington Avenue Brewery in downtown Asheville.

“At the end of the day, this (album) is me and nobody else. I only hope that everything I put out from this point will be able to follow that frame of mind, and just being honest about who I am and what I am.”

Wood, who’s hot guitar licks and Al Green-inspired voice have been a staple on the Asheville music scene for nearly two decades, is set to release his first full-length album at a CD release party Saturday, April 2 at Highland Brewing Co. The self-titled Aaron Wood album features 11 tracks inspired by recent trials and tribulations in his life, including a painful divorce.

“There aint no happiness in any song on this. It’s all about sadness and pain,” Wood said. “This album is as true about how I have felt in the last two years and there aint a single song on there that’s not painful for me. It’s cathartic as a motherfucker.”

The album has been a year and a half in the making. At the urging of his manager, Jessica Tomasin, Wood used the Kickstarter fund-raising website to help cover recording and production costs. The site raised more than $9,000 in pledges from folks all over the United States and overseas. He cut the album at Echo Mountain Recording Studio in Asheville, with some local talent lending a hand, including Artimus Pyle, Ryan Burns, Tony Black and Mike Rhodes.

At the CD release party, Wood will be joined on stage by several who helped make the album. LaZoom Bus is offering a free shuttle service from downtown in front of the Emerald Lounge to the Highland Brewing Tasting room off Old Charlotte Highway. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door.

After the CD release, the band will return to Emerald Lounge from midnight to 2 a.m. To play an after party featuring Motown and soul cover songs. The after party is free to those who attend the CD release  party. Otherwise, it’s $5.

Wood hopes the new album will allow him to take his music across the globe. Although he will always consider Asheville home, Wood also thinks it’s time to spread his wings and check out another scene for a while. New Orleans, where he regularly plays, is beckoning.

“I bitch about Asheville a lot. I get sick of it a lot, and I have an urge to stay down in New Orleans for a while,” Wood said. “New Orleans is my spiritual hometown for sure.”

written by Mike McWilliams.  Mike writes about entertainment for take5 in Asheville.

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The skinny white boy from the mountains of Western North Carolina carries around more soul in his restless bones and battered guitar than most of use could ever dream of. With a background as diverse as his music, Aaron “Woody” Wood converges elements from all walks of life to create music that we all can connect with. Aaron Wood is thrilled to announce the release of his new self-titled album at Highland Brewing on Saturday, April 2nd. The album is result of the first successful kickstarter campaign in Asheville and has been a year and a half in the making.

The album is being released by J-Woo Records and was produced at Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, NC by Roger Alan Nichols and engineered by Nichols and Jon Ashley; the run-time is 41 minutes. Along with Aaron Wood on guitar and vocals the album features Mike Rhodes on drums, Tony Black and Matt Gentling on bass, Ryan Burns on organ and piano, Debrissa McKinney on backing vocals, The Asheville Horns (Ben Hovey, Derrick Johnson, and Greg Hollowell), Jon Ashley on piano and rhodes, Artimus Pyle on percussion, and a song with cellist Paul Leech.

The release party is an early show that starts at 9pm and features the music from the album. Aaron performs along with Tony Black (Bass), Mike Rhodes (Drums), Josh Blake (Guitar), Kellin Watson (Vocals), Debrissa McKinney (Vocals), Ryan Burns (Keys), and The Asheville Horns. Aaron will be performing with a custom built amp and pedals at the show which are provided by event sponsor Suspect Device Audio.

LaZoom Bus is offering free shuttle service from downtown in front of the Emerald Lounge (the location of the after dance party) to the newly opened Highland Brewing tasting room which is located in East Asheville off of Old Charlotte Highway. In order to make reservations, just text “LaZoom” to 411669, then wait for your confirmation within 5 days. Make your reservations early to ensure that you get your seat!

The shuttle service is free for patrons thanks to event sponsors Suspect Device Audio and Text Ripple. Along with the shuttle reservations, Text Ripple also is offering a way for fans to get a free poster, koozie or free button. Just be one of the first 150 people to text “Woody” to 411699 and your free merch can be claimed at the CD Release show.

The band will be making it around town late-night for an after-dance-party at the Emerald Lounge from 12-2am to play Motown and Soul covers. This after party is free for people who attended the CD release party at Highlands; otherwise it’s $5.

Hopping around town for his album release and showing off his many styles is fitting for Aaron Wood who leaves a great legacy in the Southern region. As a professional musician, Aaron was a pivotal member of The Blue Rags, with whom he had success with national media coverage (MTV) and international tours. He has also recorded and preformed with a slew of New Orleans and Western North Carolinas finest musicians in what was a blending of New Orleans Jazz and Bluegrass. The Blue Brass sessions featured members of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Rebirth Brass Band, Larry Keel, Trombone Shorty and many others.

One look at the long list of artists he has shared the stage with exemplifies his diversity, not to mention respect from his musical peers. From Jimmy Martin to Leon Russel, R.L. Burnside to Warren Haynes, Sara Evans to Carlos Santana, Aaron has played and learned from some of those who have helped shaped music into what it is today.

Aaron delivers his music with all the soul, power, and energy that have made him renowned as a musicians musician. Roots legend, Corey Harris calls him “a master”, and Donald Harrison, New Orleans Jazz great, calls him “his musical brother.”  We hope that you can join us for the the album release of Aaron Wood!

Show Details at a Glance:
Aaron Wood CD Release Party
Highland Brewing

Saturday April 2nd
21+, Doors at 8:30; Show at 9
Tickets $10 in advance; $12 at the door

828-299-7223
12 Old Charlotte Hwy
Asheville, NC 28803
www.highlandbrewing.com
Tickets available online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/166037
Facebook event http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=130793460326088

www.aaronwoodmusic.com

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Yes, it’s true. A statewide NC NORML Chapter is now underway (but not yet nationally certified) and we are getting together, and getting down, this Sunday, June 27th. The time for action is now, as we enter the last weeks of the legislative session where the North Carolina Medical Marijuana Act, HB 1380, is pending. Come be a part and learn how to best convey your grassroots support! Part 1 is an organizational meeting; Part 2, an awesome musical celebration!

It all starts at 7pm at the French Broad Brewery with a private organizational meeting. This group will be limited to 50 people, and we will explore ideas, such as:

  • public educational events
  • legal education and action
  • music and arts events, festivals
  • adventures in public assemblage
  • documentary and film making
French Broad Brewery is opening special for us and OFFERING $3 PINTS AND DONATING $1 back to help NC NORML get 501(c)(3) status. So come on out, drink awesome local brew (as your initial donation) and throw your ideas into the mix. RSVP to Jen Foster at jnfoster@mindspring.com if you want to get involved.
______________________________________________________________
THEN…..DRUM ROLL, PLEASE…….AN AMAZING SHOW RIGHT NEXT DOOR!
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Starting around 9:30pm, the Garage will host an amazing night of music to celebrate:

Aaron "Woody" Wood, Jay Sanders, Jason Flournoy

Whenever Aaron Woody Wood, Jay Sanders, Jason Flournoy and Mike Rhodes get together, it is always Trouble.  Long time friends and musical companions, these fearless adventurers have long been an exciting and pivotal part of the Asheville music scene.  Their collective resume spans such influential groups as Acoustic Syndicate, The Blue Rags, Donna The Buffalo, Larry Keel and Natural Bridge, Hollywood Red and Shanti Groove just to skim the surface.  But none of the individuals have ever been bound to a singular identity.  Rather, each player has forged a unique and celebrated voice in the musical community.  You can expect to be entertained by their virtuosic skills as the four travelers embark on another epic adventure.  Just be sure to have your seat belt fastened, we wouldn’t want to lose anyone during take-off!

Closing out the evening are  The Screaming Js!  Boogie woogie baby! The Screaming Js are: Jake HollifieldJason Krekel, Abe Reid, Mike GrayJonathan Paul Hess, Underwood, + Special guests as announced…

Minimum $10 door to help gain 501(c)(3) status, additional contributions always welcome!

Bring yourself and ALL of your friends and be part of this historic formation of NORML in North Carolina. Spread the word.

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The Blue Rags
The Grey Eagle
Saturday, June 5, 2010

all ages, 9pm
$10 advance, $12 at the door
828-232-5800
185 Clingman Ave
Asheville, NC 28801
http://www.thegreyeagle.com
www.myspace.com/httpwwwmyspacecomthebluerags

Come celebrate the start of summer with Asheville’s home town favorites The Blue Rags. After playing hugely successful shows in the fall of 2009 at LAAFF and the Grey Eagle, as well as the 2010 French Broad Festival, they are back June 5th, 2010 at the Grey Eagle performing their own brand of Rag-N-Roll.

Don’t miss your chance to see this widely influential play live in Asheville, it doesn’t happen very often. The show will feature original members Jake Hollifield, Scott Sharpe, Abe Reid, Aaron “Woody” Wood, Mike Rhodes along with good friend Brent Sevier on bass (Bill Reynolds is in Europe touring with Band of Horses). The musical branches of The Blue Rags family tree spread deep and far.

After helping to put the WNC music scene on the map starting in the early 90’s (both before and after their stint on Sub Pop Records) through solo careers, side projects and session work; constant touring with such diverse acts as Bad Livers, Southern Culture on the Skids, Pavement, Government Mule and Leftover Salmon helped spread their reputation across America. They were also widely influential in the Americana scene right as it was coming into conception as a musical banner/umbrella. Popular bands of today, including the Avett Brothers, Old Crowe Medicine Show, and Scrappy Hamilton (now Truth and Salvage Company, touring with the Black Crowes) site The Blue Rags as musical influences.

If you are an old fan, come out to relive some memories with some old skool friends. If you’ve never seen The Blue Rags, but just heard about how great their live shows were, don’t miss your chance!

The Blue Rags @ The Grey Eagle, Asheville, NC

The Blue Rags “Take Me Back” at L.A.A.F.F Sept. 09

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So far the shows with David Gans and friends in North Carolina Have been fantastic!  Eric Crews, a reporter form the High Country times in Boone, came out to the Tuesday night show at the Rocket Club in Asheville after doing a phone interview with David early in the day. He shot some great video footage and posted a wonderful article:

David Gans & Friends Bring Psychedelic-Americana Sound to ReelHouse Friday

Creator of The Grateful Dead Hour Talks About His Music, Travels

Story by Eric Crews

APRIL 29, 2010  High Country Press

David Gans, the musical impresario behind The Grateful Dead Hour, a weekly radio show that covers all-things Grateful Dead, was driving north on Interstate 26 through the rolling hills of South Carolina en route to Asheville to play a gig when his phone rang. A reporter on the other end of the line wanted to know what the musician thought of the town of Boone during his last stop there seven years ago for a gig at a place Gans can’t remember the name of.

“When you’re on tour,” Gans explained, “you’re not really in a town, you’re kind of in a space capsule. Because, usually, you get there and you do the sound check and maybe you go the motel and then you go back and you do the gig and you get up the next morning and you go to the next gig. So a lot of times you go through places but you don’t really see them. I can tell you more about what I’ve seen on the highway than what I’ve seen in the towns in most cases.”

It is on the highway, in the midst of America and all the little nuances of everyday life on the road, that Gans finds his inspiration. Passing through small towns and stopping off in big cities, playing music with friends, meeting new people—all of these little things add up for Gans, and in the end, provide him with the incentive he needs to leave his home behind and strike out on tour for awhile.

“Being a musician is a terrible, terrible way to make a living,” he said. “Because it’s just really hard to make any money at it, but it’s a wonderful way to see the world,” Gans said, as the sound of the South Carolina wind blew through the car’s open window as he drove. “I’m driving right now in a rented car and, for me, the drives between stops on the tour are the chance to look at the planet and to check out the trees and the rocks. It’s a wonderful thing to be out in this beautiful country making music. It’s a glorious thing, really.”

When Gans is out on the road, traveling from town to town, he can’t help but to think back to the early years of the Grateful Dead and how it all got started for them.

“Jerry Garcia used to drive around the country listening to bluegrass music when he was a kid,” Gans said. “And then the Dead created this scene where young people would follow them around having adventures. Jerry said once, ‘Grateful Dead is one of the last great American adventures. It’s akin to running off joining the circus.’ So I love the festival circuit this time of year. You get to see a lot of the same people, and hear a lot of great music, and in between you get to connect with a lot of wonderful people.”

Back at home in California, when he isn’t on tour, Gans finds endless enjoyment in the simple things in his life like shopping at the Farmer’s Market with his wife, preparing home-cooked meals, and lounging with his two cats at their home near Oakland. “I feel incredibly fortunate that I’m able to have these great adventures out here in America and then go home to a life that I’m so happy with, too.”

While at home in Oakland, Gans is the host of a widely syndicated radio show, The Grateful Dead Hour. The show has aired more than 1,100 times, and over the many years has chronicled many of the incredible live performances by the Grateful Dead that have made them into the iconic symbol of the American touring band. Gans got his start with the Grateful Dead as a reporter assigned to cover the blossoming music scene of the late 1970s, and, according to Gans, the Grateful Dead was always his favorite band to cover. He first saw the Dead in 1972. “They really changed my understanding of songwriting and what music was all about,” Gans said. “I really learned a lot from the Grateful Dead.”

Part of what he picked up as a musician from the Grateful Dead was the importance of songwriting and song styling—learning quickly how merging the lyrics with the music could create synergy within the song.

“I grew up in an age when we all listened to the Beatles and thought we could change the world with songs. And I’m still trying to do that. I try to write songs about the real world that encourage people to look at the bright side,” Gans said. “Ultimately, I’m just a lover of great American music and I’m just trying to make a little of my own.”

Gans will be joined on stage this tour by a few of his friends, including Jay Saunders of Acoustic Syndicate on bass, Bobby Miller, a mandolin picker with a penchant for fast runs and Grateful Dawg-style strumming, and Mike Rhodes of the Blue Rags on drums. At a recent show in Asheville the group jammed their way through a bevy of classic American rock songs by artists such as Little Feat, Dire Straits and the Grateful Dead while getting down to a few of Gans’ originals. This combination of older classics merged with new originality is certain to hit a positive note with fans of eclectic Americana music.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.highcountrypress.com/weekly/2010/04-29-10/david-gans-and-friends.htm

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David Gans is starting off this weekend with a his run of Shows in North Carolina. He starts off at the Shakori Hills Festival in Silk Hope. Then he heads over to Asheville, Greensboro, Boone, and one secret surprise show that has not yet been announced. Check out this article from a recent interview with Ryan Snyder from Yes! Weekly in Greensboro:

‘Dead Hour’ DJ and guitarist gets a little help from friends for NC shows

By Ryan Snyder

Yes! Weekly

Songwriter, DJ and Deadhead David Gans trips out east for a run of fullband shows (photo by Bob Minkin).

It’s been a long, strange trip for David Gans. The quirky, inventive guitarist and songwriter has affixed innumerable other designations to his name over his 40-year career, all in the course of just trying to write a few songs and play a few shows. Among them are writer and author — Gans was a music journalist who wrote for several San Francisco publications in the ’70s and has published books on the Grateful Dead and the Talking Heads. But Deadheads who like their doses — the musical kind mind you — straight from the heart know Gans as the founder and still-host of the long-running and widely syndicated “Grateful Dead Radio Hour.” Gans has been in the booth for over 1000 broadcasts and as of a recent YES! Weekly interview, was working on episode no. 1127, but his journey into the booth doesn’t quite play out like one might expect.

Gans saw his first Dead show in 1972 at the behest of his then roommate and songwriting partner and it was only a few months later, he said, that he started to get a handle on what the band was doing.

“I grew up on the Beatles and was a big fan of early ’70s singer/ songwriters, the acoustic pop/folk/rock back then. The Dead expanded my horizons, so I began to get more into playing guitar and improvising,” Gans said. “It also just made me realize that songwriting could be literature. You could write stuff with depth to that that took a little more work to engage it than the pop stuff that just kind of tells you everything it knows in the first couple of listens.”

A few years later, while promoting his book Playing In the Band in 1985, Gans went onto a local radio show to produce a series of documentaries for the station and eventually began contributing regularly. They eventually asked him to take over the show and after other stations expressed interest in carrying it, it led to the “Grateful Dead Hour”’s eventual syndication.

“Without ever making a plan to do so, I sort of wandered into this thing of being the producer and host and still am 25 years later,” Gans said. “I never lost interest making my own music or all the other music out there in the world, but it became a pretty fun way to make a living.”

Though he insists that he never became a full-blown Deadhead, the band’s influence is felt all throughout Gans’ own music, from his ragged, witty Americana lyrical repertoire to his brazenly adventurous solo stage act to the Dead covers he weaves into it with regularity. Gans has become both known and celebrated for his live looping techniques, playing the role of his own rhythmic accompaniment, but for an upcoming trek to the Southeast for a string of shows, Gans will be meeting up with a few friends from North Carolina for a somewhat rare run of full-band shows on the East Coast.

Among them are Donna the Buffalo keyboardist and Greensboro resident Dave McCracken, Donna the Buffalo and Acoustic Syndicate bassist Jay Sanders, Virginia Daredevils mandolin player Bobby Miller, Biscuit Burners steel player Bill Cardine and Blue Rags drummer Mike Rhodes, who Gans has never performed alongside. With such a talented cast behind him, Gans will be setting his loop station aside for this occasion for obvious reasons, though he will be teaching a looping clinic this Saturday afternoon at the Shakori Hills Festival. [Gans and Friends performs on Wednesday, April 28th at the Blind Tiger]

“When you’re playing with a looping device, it’s like playing with a musician who’s a real dick. It can’t hear you and it can’t adjust,” Gans emphasized.” When you’re playing with a human, nothing’s perfect of course, but everybody listens to each other and the feel for what you’re doing sort of adjusts. It’s also just much more fun when you’re playing live to have others with you.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.yesweekly.com/article-9235-dead-hour-dj-and-guitarist-gets-a-little-help-from-friends-for-nc-shows.html

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David Gans and Friends

Tuesday April 27th ~ The Rocket Club ~ Asheville, NC
Wednesday, April 28th ~ The Blind Tiger ~ Greensboro, NC
Thursday, April 29th ~ MoDaddy’s ~ Asheville, NC
Friday, April 30th ~ The Reel House Cinema ~ Boone, NC


David Gans has had a long career as a media multi-hyphenate: singer-songwriter-guitarist-radio producer/host-author-journalist-record producer-photographer. That he can juggle so many balls in the air is nothing short of astonishing; that he does it with such skill, passion, assurance, wit and grace is even more remarkable.

Along with his stories and music, David has wrangles up a fine group of musicians to play with him while he is out this way: Jay Sanders on bass (Acoustic Syndicate), Dave McCracken on Keys (Donna the Buffalo), Billy Cardine on Dobro (Biscuit Burners), Mike Rhodes on Drums (The Blue Rags), and Bobby Miller on mandolin (The Virginia Dare Devils), amongst other special guests. There will be different configurations of musicians on the different days…

Known far and wide as the light behind the widely syndicated Grateful Dead Hour radio program, several books on the Dead and a number of intriguing CDs relating to the band and its music (see discography below), David has in recent years developed a solid following nationwide for his compelling songs and music. In fact, despite the economic downturn, David says he’s had his best year ever out on the road: “I’m having great gigs! Creatively, I’m as satisfied as I can be. I’m in complete control of my own musical destiny and I’m doing it on my own terms. I don’t have any executives telling me they ‘don’t hear a single,’” he laughs. “I’m not at anybody’s mercy.”

But “skilled solo performer” fills only one page of David’s artistic resumé. Besides playing in all sorts of bands through the years—from the fondly remembered Reptiles to the Honky Tonk Hippies, to his recent forays jamming on Beatles songs with Chris and Lorin Rowan (and friends) in a group called Rubber Souldiers—he’s also sat in with an amazing range of fine musicians, such as Phil Lesh, Donna the Buffalo, Henry Kaiser, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Ollabelle, the late great Vassar Clements, Jim Lauderdale, The String Cheese Incident, Peter Rowan, and moe., to name just a few.

He has also written songs with a host of others, including Jim Page, Lorin Rowan, and Robert Hunter. And his live repertoire is peppered with an incredibly broad (and unpredictable) range of cover tunes by old and new musical heroes. Pressed to list some of his own songwriting influences not too long ago, David reeled off Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Neil Young, Jackson Browne, Steve Goodman, John Prine, CSN, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Holland-Dozier-Holland, Mann & Weil, Carole King, Gram Parsons, Elton John & Bernie Taupin, Robbie Robertson, and the Grateful Dead; quite a list. But he’ll also tell you that in recent years, as he’s toured extensively and played with so many superb musicians at festivals and in other settings, he’s discovered a whole new generation of songwriters and players who are inspiring him.

As both a player and a fan, he understands the indefinable transformative power of music—how it feeds our very life-force, bonds us together in obvious and unseen ways, teaches us, heals us, makes us better citizens of this fragile planet.

As David notes, “I came up in the time when we thought music could change world, and I still think it can—the only way the world can be changed: one person, one soul at a time.”

He’s definitely doing his part!

Check out this great review of David’s  new single release, “Life is  Jam”

David Gans on the web:
Blog: http://cloudsurfing.gdhour.com
Web site: http://www.dgans.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dgans
Music: http://www.cdbaby.com/all/dgans


David Gans Show details:

The Mindtopnic Music Series: David Gans, Jay Sanders, Billy Cardine, Bobby Miller & Tim Haney
Tuesday, April 27th, 2010
The Rocket Club

$5, 9pm
401 Haywood Rd.
Asheville, NC. 28806
828.505.2494
http://www.therocketclub.net

David Gans, Jay Sanders, Bobby Miller, Dave McCracken, and guests
Wednesday, April 28th, 2010
The Blind Tiger

$7, 9:30 doors
2115 Walker Ave
Greensboro, NC 27403
336-272-9888
http://www.theblindtiger.com/

David Gans, Jay Sanders, Billy Cardine, Bobby Miller & Mike Rhodes
Thursday, April 29th, 2010
Mo Daddy’s

$5, 9pm
77-B Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, NC
828-258-1550
www.myspace.com/modaddysbar

David Gans, Jay Sanders, Bobby Miller & Mike Rhodes
Friday, April 30th, 2010
The Reel House Cinema
The Lost Ridge Band opens

$5, doors 10pm
828-262-3222
215 Boone Heights Drive
Boone, NC 28607
-Turn at the Burger King, they are across from the Wellness Center
http://www.thereelhouseboone.com/

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