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Hard Working Americans, Moonalice, Dead Winter Carpenters Play HUMANITY RISING — A Butte Fire Benefit on Sat, Dec 19, 2015 at Calaveras County Fairgrounds, Angels Camp, CA

HUMANITY RISING Share The Spirit
Family Friendly, 3 stages in 3 buildings, Dinner and Silent Auction
1pm to Midnight

Tickets are $25 in advance through Eventbrite or the Sierra Nevada Adventure Company stores in Murphys, Sonora, and Arnold, as well as Outer Aisle in Murphys & The Pickle Patch in San Andreas
$35 at the door. Kids under 12 free. Ages 13-16 $10
101 Frogtown Rd, Angels Camp, CA 95222

RSVP on Facebook and find out more here→
www.facebook.com/HUMANITYRISINGSHARETHESPIRIT

HOMER, AK– The Blue Mountain Community Renewal Council, a 501C3- non-profit, is partnering with HUMANITY RISING – Share the Spirit, A Butte Fire Benefit on December 19th at the Calaveras County Fairgrounds.

Set to perform, and graciously donating their time, are Hard Working Americans (a recently formed ‘Super group’ consisting of Todd Snider, Dave Schools, Neal Casal, Duane Trucks, Chad Staehly, and Jesse Aycock), Moonalice out of San Fransisco, Dead Winter Carpenters from the Tahoe area, Edge of the West from Santa Cruz, Grateful Bluegrass Boys and Dusty Greenbones Band from Mendicino, and many more! Plus the best MC of our time, Wavy Gravy and a psychedelic light show by Liquid Lights.

It’s a family friendly event with three stages in three buildings, dinner, and silent auction and runs from 1pm through Midnight. HUMANITY RISING is looking for donations and volunteers to help make this event as impactful as possible. Proceeds will be distributed promptly and equitably to the most needy families and individuals promptly in order to help provide some degree of holiday comfort.

“Our first show ever was a benefit show for flood victims in Colorado. We understand how these giant natural disasters put hard-working Americans’ backs up against the wall.” say The Hard Working Americans. “We’re in a position to help so let’s all join together and make a difference. It takes a village.”

The Butte Fire started in early September 2015 in the Sierra Nevada Foothills of California and was one of the among the worst in the State’s history, with over 70,000 acres burned, as well as an estimated 500 plus homes.

“If you are thinking the Butte Fire is over, stop assuming someone else is doing the work that needs to be done.” Long time Tuolumne and Calaveras county resident, promoter, philanthropist, and co-producer of Humanity Rising Jim Stearns says, “There’s some perception or rationalization that there is enormous help coming in. It’s the proverbial ‘somebody else is taking care of it’ problem. If those who are still warm, dry and relatively wealthy that live within 25 miles of the devastation would give 10 percent of their time and/or resources the problem would largely be handled already. Unfortunately many are buying useless crap for Christmas, taking vacations and ignoring the tragedy their neighbors are facing right over the hill.”

The mission of this event will be to provide grants to those that have had their homes and lives destroyed by the Butte Fire. Those that are uninsured, well underinsured and haven’t or haven’t the ability to secure major funding from other agencies such as Red Cross and FEMA will be given the highest priority.

Wendy Cox, a “boots on the ground” type of person, posted a comprehensive and accurate write-up about the situation entitled, Why Is help still needed?.” “Hundreds (if not more than 1,000) of displaced people (more than 500 residences were lost to the fire) are living in inadequate conditions. They are confounded by their situation, and at a loss for what they are going to do. Many do not have potable water, if they have water at all. They are toileting in the sticks that used to be forest. They are sleeping on the bare ground if they are not fortunate to have a tarp. They do not enjoy a hot meal. They are waking up to frost and constant dampness that sleeping outdoors will bring (seniors are especially vulnerable to health problems in this environment.) Basic needs remain unmet.

When a disaster strikes there is an outpour of support which quickly turns to a trickle. Some of the temporary fixes and help have left… Because it has been two months and recovery will take 10-15 years.  Because there are victims still waiting for basic needs to be met.  Because victims are being swallowed by bureaucracy. Because people still feel lost, and confused.  Because it is the right thing to do.

The producers of the Humanity Rising benefit concert are Jim and Alisa Stearns, Linda Sanchez, and Emily West. Jim was owner and operator of Avery Ranch from 1974 until 2011. Alisa was born and raised in Sonora and has partnered with Jim on countless fundraising endeavors. Linda Sanchez, a long time Calaveras activist, was a Butte Fire victim, (lost everything) and Emily is a long time resident of the county as well. Blue Mountain Community Renewal Council is the 501C3 that will be the steward of the event and for providing this administrative service as well as providing insurance, this organization will take 3% of the revenue. BMCRC, located in San Andreas, is listed by the Sierra Health Foundation as one of the five recipients of their community grants as an organization working for the relief of Butte Fire victims.

“We do our best to live up to the mantra: Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the places you can. In all the ways you can. To all the people you can. At all the times you can, for as long as you can.” Jim Stearns says “We have a deep connection to the land and the people that were devastated by the fire. We believe that if people just do what they can to help, in the relief of their neighbors and friends, then we together we can make a huge impact. Maybe it’s a day of work. Maybe it’s five bucks or maybe it’s a hundred. Maybe it’s taking somebody in, loaning somebody your RV or making food.  We all have something we can offer. For us, we happen to be good at bringing people together for a good time as well as a good cause. Like everybody else, we’re just offering to help in the way we know best.”

“We are in the process of contacting individuals and organizations who are working tirelessly on the ground for recommendations and nominations for possible recipients of these funds.” Alisa Stearn says, “We are acutely aware that misuse, misdirection and administrative costs often decimate the effectiveness of these endeavors and remain deeply committed to making sure that this event will be as transparent and efficient as humanly possible.”

More Information and to get involved, please contact Jim Stearns, jim@salmonfestalaska.org or Alisa Mooy alisa@salmonfestalaska.org.

Humanity Rising – A Butte Fire Benefit:
Hard Working Americans
Moonalice
Dead Winter Carpenters
Edge of West
Grateful Bluegrass Boys
Dusty Greenbones Band
Folk Goddess Diane Patterson
Nedra & Julio
Thick Soup
Big Joe Daddy
Felicity Oceansong
Nicole Sass
MC Wavy Gravy
Plus a Psychedelic Light show by Liquid Lights
More tba!

Ticket link → www.eventbrite.com/e/humanity-rising-share-the-spirit-butte-fire-benefit-concert-tickets-19321362716?aff=efbbt

RSVP on Facebook and find out more here→
www.facebook.com/HUMANITYRISINGSHARETHESPIRIT

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bob susan_Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015Grateful and Unforgettable: Lockn’ 2015 in Review.
Words By Kirby Farineau; Photos by Milo Farineau

Stepping up the grassy hill to attend the third annual Lockn’ Music Festival, attendees were greeted with the sight of the event in all its grandeur. Fields of tents, cars, and RVs stretched into the distance far from the dazzling Oakridge stage. Held inside the Oakridge farm racetrack, Lockn’ provides a wide open space for its many thousands of attendees. Based on previous year’s success, the setup for year three is mostly unchanged, providing a great structure to explore the festival grounds and enjoy the music from almost anywhere.

One cannot discuss this year’s festivities without mentioning the unfortunate and literal rain on the parade. Due to an intense storm system on Wednesday, there was enough damage to the festival stage, vendor tents, and campgrounds that impaired their ability to safely run on its scheduled opening day. To the dismay of many, the festival shut all Thursday events down, turning attendees away to the many impromptu pop-up shantytowns in campgrounds and parking lots around the state. Some of the acts were lost, as Thursday was the only day they could play (Little Feat, Galactic, etc.), but Lockn’ was quick to remedy the situation, taking action to create a condensed schedule of music for the remainder of the weekend, making the best of the time and musical talents they had to work with.

Doobie_Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015_1Seeing as that first Friday fell on the important but somber date of 9/11, the festival did their best to honor the occasion in a way that didn’t dwell on the tragedy. John Popper of Blues Traveler took the stage first to deliver the national anthem, surrounded by a group of first responders from the attack on the Twin Towers underneath a big star spangled banner waving for everyone to see. After a few moments to reflect, the swaths of festival attendees bunched up towards the stage were finally greeted with the sounds of The Doobie Incident, a respective combination of classic rock band The Doobie Brothers, and The String Cheese Incident, who played classics from the Doobie’s career but with some added instrumentation from String Cheese. The rest of the first day’s acts followed in a seamless succession, as bands like Seth Stainback and Roosterfoot, Moonalice, and the North Mississippi Allstars all provided rocking, roots, and bluesy sets before New Orleans singer songwriter Anders Osborne and his band brought their original style of heavy funk/blues rock to the stage.

Phil_Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015Steve Earle and The Dukes, with his deep southern tones and their unique country style provided a chance for audience members to gather themselves, and prepare for a torrential outpouring of musical experiences that evening which surpassed the literal storm from the days before. The String Cheese Incident revisited the stage to deliver their own set, followed closely by a performance from the always varying Phil and Friends, this time featuring the fantastic vocal stylings of Lockn’ veteran, Chris Robinson, who took the stage singing classic Grateful Dead tunes in front of Phil Lesh, himself. This was the first of many performances that emphasized one of the greatest elements of Lockn’: collaboration. The cooperative efforts of veteran musicians across genres made for some historical and downright crazy performances throughout the rest of the weekend.

LR_Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015The night ended with back- to-back powerhouse celebrations of music history: The 50 year anniversary of Jefferson Airplane, and a tribute to the late Joe Cocker. The first performance featured Jack and Jorma of Hot Tuna fame, alongside Rachael Price of Lake Street Dive, and drummer Bill Kreutzmann, followed by an unforgettable show simply dubbed Mad Dogs and Englishmen. There’s something magical about seeing Susan Tedeschi, Leon Russell, and Chris Robinson all on the same stage alongside Cocker’s old backup singers like Rita Coolidge which created an image and a sound that attendees will not soon forget.  Closing up with late night performances from Mickey Hart and Umphrey’s McGee, Friday came to a very rousing and very late conclusion.

Karl_Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015Things ramped up early on Saturday kicking things off with one of the Rockn’ to Lockn’ contest winners, local country band Lord Nelson, followed by the always entertaining 80’s cover bluegrass group Love Canon.  Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe teamed up with keyboardist Chuck Leavell to deliver a remarkable performance of soulful horn-heavy rock before Hot Tuna once more took the stage, this time playing a sit down acoustic set of their own music and introspective conversation, allowing audience members a little period of relaxation. More great sets that afternoon with the Tedeschi Trucks Band, who somehow get better with every performance. The soulful duo of quiet guitarist Derek Trucks alongside wife Susan Tedeschi, a woman who could sing the roof off a stadium, was soon joined by Grateful Dead legend Bob Weir for a few tunes. The appearance of Weir enamored audience members with another brilliant aspect of Lockn’: The Legacy of the Grateful Dead.

billy_1_Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015Ever since the grand reunion show in Chicago, speculation about the Grateful Dead at Lockn’ gripped the hopes of Deadheads everywhere. For many who were unable to attend that “last show” at Soldier’s Field, it seems that Lockn’ was a possible opportunity to see the four members in some capacity. Ever since Lockn’ organizers Dave Fry and Pete Shapiro announced that all four members were going to be there, the hearts and minds of fans everywhere were racing.

Before that was to be seen, we got musical legend Robert Plant with the Sensational Space Shifters , followed shortly by what at this point seems to be a Lockn’ tradition of Widespread Panic collaborating with a classic musician, in this case Jimmy Cliff.

Mickey_2Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015Then came a show from Billy and The Kids, which may be the closest to the real lineup people may ever get, with Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann, and Mickey Hart all performing on the Oak Stage, while Phil Lesh set up for his show on the Ridge Stage adjoining (but not accompanying). For a very brief moment in time, from the audience, one could at least see all four members of the Grateful Dead together, in some capacity on stage together.

The second Phil and Friends show was as interesting as the first, featuring two different but masterful guitarists Warren Haynes and Carlos Santana. Saturday finished with another late night performance from Mickey Hart, and an appearance of Govt Mule.

Sunday waved goodbye to the thousands of festival-goers, but not without a few more stunning performances. Richmond reps and Rockn’ to Lockn’ winners, The Southern Belles , followed by Fishbone, The Oh Hellos, and a hip shaking performance by St. Paul and The Broken Bones. Save for performances from Trombone Shorty and Slightly Stoopid, the last evening was comprised of artists (Widespread Panic, Gov’t Mule, and Robert Plant) who had  played previously, but played additional sets in different configurations, proving that more is sometimes better.

plant_2Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015It seems that with each successive and successful year, Lockn’ has become one of the biggest and most unforgettable festivals in Virginia. Through the efforts of vendors, volunteers, and staff, Lockn’ managed to overcome significant environmental challenges and not only compensated but turned obstacle into accomplishment by providing collaborative combinations into experiences unlikely to ever be forgotten by event participants.

hot tuna_Mickey_2Lockn_byMiloFarineau2015RachaelLockn_byMiloFarineau2015WP_1_Lockn_byMiloFarineau_2015Steve_1_Lockn_byMiloFarineau_2015

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