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Posts Tagged ‘Rose Sinclair’

Sugar Hill recording artist, Tara Nevins, has been invited to play a showcase at this year’s Americana Music Association Festival in Nashville on Saturday, October 15th at The Station Inn at 10pm!

Performing along with Tara at the Station Inn are:
Rose Sinclair – Banjo, Accordion
Todd Phillips – Bass
Chris Henry – Acoustic Guitar
Mike Compton – Mandolin
Tommy Hannum – Pedal Steel, Electric Guitar
Mark Raudabaugh – Drums

This showcase will be live-streamed by Fat Music Radio who will be broadcasting from the Station Inn during AMA week!


Tara can also be heard LIVE on Music Fog at 3pm on Friday Oct 14th.

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Check out this fantastic mix that NPR Music put together with music from artists involved in the event. Nevins’s version of “Stars Fell on Alabama” is included. Others in the mix are The Avett Brothers, Bela Fleck, Buddy Miller, The Civil Wars, David Wax Museum, Jim Lauderdale, Justin Townes Earle, Lucinda Williams, Mumford and Sons, Peter Rowan, Sarah Jarosz, Pokey Lafarge and more!

Find the complete AMA showcase schedule here:   
http://americanamusic.org/showcase-lineup

Information about other Sugar Hill and Vanguard Recording Artists can be found at: https://dreamspider.wordpress.com/2011/10/06/sugar-hill-vanguard-recording-artists-at-at-ama-2011/

American roots traditionalist Tara Nevins’ new release, ‘Wood and Stone’ is an exploration of her own heritage, musical and otherwise. Released on May 3rd, 2011 on Sugar Hill Records ‘Wood and Stone’ was produced by Larry Campbell at the Levon Helm Studios in Woodstock, NY. It showcases Nevins’ ever-evolving repertoire as she journeys both back to her own “roots” and head-long into new territory. Featured guests on the album include Levon Helm, Jim Lauderdale, Allison Moorer, Teresa Williams, The Heartbeats, along with the core band of Larry Campbell, Justin Guip, and Byron Isaacs

Fans of Nevins from her 21-year tenure with Donna the Buffalo are familiar with her versatile talents; she shares the vocal and songwriting responsibilities for the band and is a stellar musician on fiddle, guitar, and accordion. (She plays a mean scrubboard too.) Prior to DTB, Nevins was a founding member of the all-female, old time/Cajun band The Heartbeats. (They join her on two tracks here as well.) Wood and Stone delivers the musical expertise fans have come to expect and surprises with new perspectives.

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“A tour de force from start to finish” – Kay Cordtz, Elmore

“With the wonderful fiddle groove and vividly written lyrics, Nevins gives a glimpse into her roots. Stepping out for a rare solo record (beyond her beloved band, Donna the Buffalo), she meshes her Cajun influences, unique voice, drums and steel guitars for an intriguing look at her heritage.” – CMT

“Wood And Stone adds another powerful and engaging chapter to Nevins’ musical achievements”. – Steven Stone, Vintage Guitar

“a wide-ranging affair encompassing all manner of rootsy Americana, spiced with Nevins’s voice and multi-instrumentalist skills, served up in a package that is polished but never slick. Nevins, in other words, is the real deal.” – David Maine, Pop Matters

“If heroes and heroines of rock ‘n’ roll are defined by their uniqueness, they definitely broke the mold when they made Tara Nevins.” – Wildman Steve, The Corner News

“The centerpiece of the album, in my opinion, is the sweeping “The Wrong Side,” which features Allison Moorer and Teresa Williams. It’s a track sounds like it was from the O’Brother Where Art Thou? sessions, but the same could be said of the haunting “Stars Fell On Alabama,” where once again Nevins shows her prowess on the fiddle. This is an exceptional piece of music, one that I think needs to be heard—to prove that people are still cutting “Country Music” these days!” – Chuck Dauphin, Music News Nashville

Visit Tara Nevins website www.TaraNevins.com for more information about the album, a gallery of images, videos, music, and lyrics.

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Tara Nevins is sharing the song “Stars Fell on Alabama” from the new album Wood and Stone. This is Nevins’ version of the jazz classic. She was commissioned to rewrite this song for the soundtrack to “20 Years After” a post-apocalyptic movie directed by Jim Torres in Huntsville, Alabama.

“‘Wood and Stone’ is strangely hypnotic at times, with its mesmerizing rhythms and Nevins’ relaxed but commanding delivery. The beautifully dark “Tennessee River” and her cover of the jazz standard, ‘Stars Fell On Alabama,’ are entrancing and highlight Nevins’ beautiful voice” – Boone Mountain Times

Listen to “Stars Fall on Alabama”

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“Opening with a mournful fiddle and Rose Sinclair’s poignant banjo and even though I am familiar with at least two dozen other renditions of the song, it’s as though I heard it for the first time. It is stunning in its quietness.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

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TaraNevins.com

You can also find Tara on facebook  facebook.com/TaraNevins

and DonnaTheBuffalo.com


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Wood and Stone is available at:
iTunes: http://www.itunes.com/taranevins
Amazon: http://amzn.to/lcEglg

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“Larry has taken Tara’s music to an entirely higher level, if this doesn’t turn into an award winner they’ll have been cheated!” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association “as invigorating as it is mesmerizing.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

“Campbell and Nevins work some real magic here”  – Hyperbolium

“The sound is both loose and tight at the same time; the band knows how to walk that line and let Nevins be herself. To put it simply, it just plain works.”  – Brian Robbins, Jambands.com

“As much as I have listened to “Mule to Ride” during the past twelve years, I, like many other Donna fans,  have also yearned to hear Tara in her own voice, on her own terms. The new album is just that — and more.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

“‘Stars Fell On Alabama’ is Tara’s version of an old standard, while ‘Tennessee River’ sounds like she’s written a new standard.” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association

“The pedigree of the album is staggering.  Start with Nevins, who has been an integral member of DTB since its formation in 1987, and add producer Larry Campell along with guest performers Levon Helm, Jim Lauderdale, Allison Moorer, and Teresa Williams, and you get a record that is as solid as the building materials mentioned in the title.” – Fifty Cent Lighter Blog

“‘What Money Cannot Buy’ and ‘The Wrong Side’ are two different versions on ‘I’ve been wronged”’ songs, the latter being one of the most upbeat sounding takes on breaking up that I’ve ever heard.” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association

“But even that great track [The Wrong Side] did not prepare me for what comes next, the only song Tara did not write, the jazz vocal standard, “Stars Fell on Alabama.” Opening with a mournful fiddle and Rose Sinclair’s poignant banjo and even though I am familiar with at least two dozen other renditions of the song, it’s as though I heard it for the first time. It is stunning in its quietness.” – Amos Perrine, No Depression

“If you like the fiddle, in almost all it’s various forms, and want to wade into something with country, old time, zydeco, cajun, and maybe even some bluegrass touches, you couldn’t do better than to start with this CD.” – Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association

“her songs stretch out across all her influences, including fiddle- and steel-lined country, second line rhythms and the Cajun sounds of her earlier band, the Heartbeats.”  – Hyperbolium

“… her music takes on the spirit of the [Levon Helm] Barn like a well-worn and cozy Gypsy jacket that was tailored to her shoulders.” – Brian Robbins, Jambands.com

“Producer Larry Campbell fits each song with a unique groove and adds superb electric and pedal steel guitar. The girlishness in Nevins’ voice and the layering of double-tracked vocals add a hint of the Brill Building, which is a terrific twist on the rustic arrangements.”  – Hyperbolium

“… Riding high from producing two Grammy Award winners for Helm, Campbell keeps things bright and tight without giving up intimacy.  And, that’s the charm of this album, the sense of getting a peek into Nevins’ splendid soul and her vast woodsy song repertoire.” –Billing Gazette

“soulful country groove” – Hyperbolium


“‘Wood and Stone’ is strangely hypnotic at times, with its mesmerizing rhythms and Nevins’ relaxed but commanding delivery. The beautifully dark “Tennessee River” and her cover of the jazz standard, ‘Stars Fell On Alabama,’ are entrancing and highlight Nevins’ beautiful voice” – Boone Mountain Times

“The lyrics cast an eye on relationships that refuse to live up to their potential, with music that underlines the certainty of a woman who will no longer suffer others’ indecision, inaction or infidelity.”  – Hyperbolium

“‘Wood and Stone’ is not emotionally-wrenching, rather it is a wise retrospective of the joys and sorrows of love. Nevins’ writing isn’t that of an angry divorcee, so don’t expect the album to be a diatribe on men. Her writing is a reflection of experiences to which anyone can relate.”  – Boone Mountain Times

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