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Galen Kipar Project’s new album the Scenic Route is set for Asheville release on Saturday May 29th at the Lexington Ave Brewery. The show starts at 9pm.

“Each song on Routes is carefully orchestrated and worked with the tender care of a master painter at his easel. Kipar elevates this eight-song collection far beyond standard singer/songwriter fare, wringing emotion and texture from each song and adding layers of interest with rich, resonant percussion and an intricate dance of string tones, states Mtn Xpress writer Alli Marshall.  Click here to read the album review.

Check out this great interview in this week’s Mountain Xpress:

Taking the Scenic Route

Galen Kipar Project returns with a fluid, effortless new album

by Dane Smith in Vol. 16 / Iss. 44 on 05/26/2010 rocknrolldane@gmail.com

Mountain Xpress www.mountainx.com

The aptly titled fourth effort from Asheville’s symphonic-folk outfit The Galen Kipar Project is loaded with images of mountains, rivers, forests and streams, and backed by lush arrangements, fluid vocals and Appalachian instrumentation that bring to life what is essentially a musical portrait of Western North Carolina.

And that, says Kipar, is no accident. The album’s title is not only a literal reference to the years the band has spent on the road, but also a reflection on the way they’ve approached their career.

Water signs: The album has a theme of water and currents that Kipar says was unintentional, but not surprising.

“We feel like we’ve taken the scenic route as a band,” he explains. “We’ve been playing for a while, and we’re still trucking along. And Western North Carolina is such a beautiful area. We couldn’t ask for a better place to drive around and play music, where 75 percent of your job is driving. It definitely reflects on this area.”

What was less intentional, he admits with a laugh, is the album’s underlying theme of water and currents. Nearly every track on The Scenic Route mentions, whether in passing or in the song title itself, to some form of water. But Kipar insists that the repeated imagery was pure coincidence, or at least “subconscious regurgitation.”

“It kind of was by accident,” Kipar says in a way that suggests he expected this to come up. “I really didn’t recognize it at first, and then someone said, ‘Hey, there’s a lot of references to water on this album.’ Then it became apparent. But for me personally, I am a water person. I’ve spent a lot of time near and on the water and I love it. There is a lot of inspiration that comes from water and currents and just being in that environment.

“I tried to come up with an album title that captured the parallels between music and the currents that you might find in water, or in moving water. But I didn’t nail it on the head. They always come after the fact.”

Nevertheless, the eight-song offering is, from start to finish, relaxed, easy, accessible and relatable, yet layered and dense at the same time. Kipar’s vocal delivery is bouncy but gentle, and his harmonica provides a down-home grittiness that balances the atmosphere of strings and flute, which is really the key to Kipar’s appeal. Somehow, he manages to convey the simplicity of folk through the complexities of jazz and classical arrangements, without losing sight of the message.

For his part, Kipar offers a simpler explanation.

“Often it starts out as a whistle, honestly,” he says. “Once you find that melody, those few couple of notes that really define the song, you can start to develop the other parts based on that original melody. Really, all I’m trying to do is develop that original melody and vary it —cover that entire territory, basically.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.mountainx.com/ae/2010/052610taking_the_scenic_route

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Check out this review in Asheville’s Mountain Xpress of Galen Kipar Project’s newest album, The Scenic Route.

SoundTrack Web Extra

by Alli Marshall on 03/29/2010

http://mountainx.com/ae/2010/soundtrack_web_extra4/

The last thing I wanted to hear on a sunny afternoon, winter still too close to have forgiven it for its chilly insult, is a song that begins, “October snow is coming down.” But the lead track to The Galen Kipar Project‘s new record, The Scenic Route is luminous and warm; Kipar’s vocals as light and syncopated as water cascading over rocks.

Actually, water is an adroit descriptor for an album rife with liquid references. “Rushing Over My Bones,” “The Shore Rushed By” and “Riversong” — and those are just the song titles. “It’s silent up here, silent as water freezing,” he sings on “How I’ve changed.”

…there’s a sense of sea change. Seasons, natural metaphors, moody meditations allude to darker stirrings beyond the album’s first buoyant offering…

Each song on Routes is carefully orchestrated and worked with the tender care of a master painter at his easel. Kipar elevates this eight-song collection far beyond standard singer/songwriter fare, wringing emotion and texture from each song and adding layers of interest with rich, resonant percussion and an intricate dance of string tones. He pushes the envelope of how many sounds can be introduced without reducing the sum to a fuzzy, sonic snarl. In each moment the symphonic result is shined to a high gloss and, despite more than one turn through the soul’s dark night, Kipar never loses sight of the bright warmth with which he begins the journey of this CD.

If Galen Kipar’s The Scenic Route — a name which at first seems vague, but, on closer examination, proves apt — is not a work of mastery, it’s damned close. Learn more at galenkipar.com.

—Alli Marshall, A&E reporter

READ the complete review here: http://mountainx.com/ae/2010/soundtrack_web_extra4/

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