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I am so grateful to be included on @Scout66com‘s Janet Hansen’s list of influential women in music! Here’s a short excerpt of the post; click the link to find out about some amazing women that are all on twitter 🙂

A Tip of The Tiara to Influential Women In Music 2012

Read the full post at: http://scout66com.wordpress.com/2012/01/04/a-tip-of-the-tiara-to-influential-women-in-music-2012/

… Let’s look behind the curtain of Twitter for some great contacts and real women  who make the music world go round.Each of these women has a great spirit and a professionalism that fuels a flame under music projects they are hired to handle or those they have a passion for. Listed in no particular order, make sure to follow each of these women to build a foundation of  relationships this industry is built on.

@BigBlendMag  – Nancy Reid and Lisa Smith, a mother/daughter team,  are amazing women who have grabbed new media by the long tail. Internet radio and online magazines are their specialties, and they reach over 270,000 people daily covering myriad topics including new music. Lisa is the Twitter contact, and she’s always in touch with a kind word to make you smile.

@Renagades – Susan Leak makes no bones about how she feels about music. It’s her life! She caters to indie artists from around the world and has a number of social media publications published on http://paper.li which spin her social media posts even further into cyberspace. Check out her site to see how many irons she has in the fire…the woman is a pistol!

@The_MusicMuse  – Jennifer Stoker has recently exploded on the social media music scene. She is a music content writer promoting musicians via reviews on @IndMusicMedia and is the promotions and talent coordinator for @realmsofmusic. You’d be hard pressed to find a nicer person than Jennifer.

@Dreamspiderweb – Erin Scholze is an indie music publicist with a specialty in roots music representing many artists from the cultural hearth of Asheville, North Carolina.  With a firm grasp on the absolute necessity of PR and marketing, Erin’s tagline is, “These things just don’t happen by themselves…” Just keep repeating that phrase, because without PR and marketing, there is no market!

Click to read about all twenty featured women in Music!

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Here’s some great excerpts fom an article about Donna the Buffalo in preview for their show at 123 Plesant Street in Morgantown, WV Jan 22.

Donna the Buffalo Takes the Stage at 123

…  … …
The roots band — which easily blends several genres from folk to reggae — has come through Morgantown for 20 years.
…According to 123 owner L.J. Giuliani, the group’s sound remains consistently infectious.
“… is heavily influenced by a zydeco swing that makes it hard not to dance to,” he said in an email. “That lends itself to a pretty high-energy show that people really love. They have toured the region extensively, so their reputation definitely proceeds them.”
… … …
Nevins said she hopes to see some familiar faces in the crowd, which isn’t an uncommon experience. The band’s fans, who call themselves The Herd, are a dedicated bunch, even starting a charitable fundraising organization, Side To Side Charities, in 2002.
“A lot of fans show up at a lot of the gigs, and we’ve gotten to know them and recognize them,” Nevins said.
Self-organized, The Herd is quite active, she said, and several websites have been created to help fans keep in touch with one another.
The band’s own website, Facebook page and Twitter account also keeps those interested up-to-date with photos and commentary from recent shows as well as any other pertinent information.
For instance, the band recently posted on its Facebook page that it will be included in “JAMerica,” a documentary and book project by Peter Conners and Denver Miller that focuses on the genre’s emergence and growth.
Nevins said band members will meet with the project’s organizers in the next two weeks to discuss details.
And that’s not all that’s on the band’s plate. In the midst of a busy touring schedule, Donna the Buffalo will head to Nashville in the next couple of months to record another album, more than two years after its latest effort “Silverlined.” And in April, Nevins’ solo album “Wood and Stone” will debut. Both albums are set for release on Sugar Hill Records.
While the band’s schedule can be hectic, Nevins said finding time to rest, get some good food on the road and take care herself helps. And a positive perspective can’t hurt either.
“Everybody is really busy doing whatever they do,” she said. “We’re no different. If you love what you do, that’s an advantage to anyone.”

Fun Herd related sites:

 

 

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Below are excerpts from a  fantastic interview with Donna the Buffalo’s Tara Nevins by Cincy Groove’s Scott Preston. Scott also recently started the new website JambandNews.com. Click on the photo to read the full article.

Interview with Tara Nevins from Donna The Buffalo

tara nevins, donna the buffalo

Interview and Photos by Scott Preston.

READ THE ORIGINAL POST in Cincy Groove, JamBandNews, and Columbus Groove

To begin to understand Tara’s passion for music, one must first look to the Old-time musical community where Tara has spent over 20 years playing the fiddle. But these days her love of Zydeco is equally as influential. Beyond her time with Donna The Buffalo, Tara spent almost 10 years playing with the all-female Cajun/Old-time band, The Heartbeats, and plans to release a new solo record in April of 2011 for Sugar Hill.

Cincy Groove: I understand you have a new solo record coming out, how is it coming along?

Tara Nevins: We are finished recording it and its being mixed right now. It’s coming out on Sugar Hill Records with a release date of April of 2011. I have been very fortunate to get to work with Larry Campbell on the record. Larry plays in Levon Helm’s band and he also produced both of Levon’s records, Electric Dirt and Dirt Farmer, both of which won Grammy’s. As if that wasn’t enough he also played in Bob Dylan’s touring band for 8 years. Right now he also is producing a record for Hot Tuna, I just feel very fortunate to get to work with him.

tara nevins, donna the buffaloCincy Groove: How would you describe the sound of your new record?

Tara Nevins: Its very organic, we recorded it up in Levon Helm’s studio in Woodstock. I would say its somewhere between traditional/Americana and Donna the Buffalo. I wrote all the songs myself except for one Van Morrison cover. Last time I did a solo record, 10 years ago, I had other people doing all the singing. But this time around I am doing the singing.

Cincy Groove: Who did you have playing on the new record?

Tara Nevins: The nucleus of the band was Larry Campbell, Byron Issacs, who plays bass in Levon’s band, Justin Glip who is the engineer at the studio played drums on quite a few tracks. I was also very fortunate to get to have Levon Helm play drums on 2 songs. I overdubbed some fiddle, accordion, tambourine, and Larry played pedal steel, mandolin, banjo, electric guitar, bass. We also had Teresa Williams and Amy Helm (Levon’s daughter) do some vocals, they both also sing in Levon’s band. Allison Moore came in to sing on a song as well. I played in an all female string band, called The Heartbeats. So I had those gals come in and we ripped out a couple tunes.

Cincy Groove: Are there any plans for a new Donna The Buffalo record?

Tara Nevins: We are planning to record sometime in February 2011, I was just on the phone with Jeb talking about that. We are definitely due for a new record. We may record it down in Nashville.

Find out about DtB’s involvement with The GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance by clicking to the original post here.

tara nevins, donna the buffalo

Cincy Groove: How do you feel about how the internet has changed the current music business model?

Tara Nevins: There are pros and cons. I think the big difference is that now there is more of a connection between the musicians and their fans. Before the internet, you would wait for the record to come out, you would see a few articles in magazines like Rolling Stone or maybe a review in your local paper. That was really it for your connection to the music. It was a mentality of its us and them. Now not only do you get a cd, but you can hear a few songs online before the release. The fans can also goto the band’s Myspace, Facebook and Twitter pages to see whats new with the band. There isn’t such a barrier between the fans and the musician like there was before the internet. People also get to discover music that they might not have heard otherwise. On the negative side, the computer can be a little impersonal and you can waste a lot of time on it (laughing). Bands just don’t sell records like they use to, since people can now get music for free. The art form is still in transition. Donna The Buffalo is lucky in that we sell a lot of records at shows.

READ MORE AT THE ORIGINAL POST.

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Join Lingua Musica LIVE at The Showroom in Spartanburg at 8pm Tuesday, November 30th!

Joe Kendrick will be talking with Paul Riddle, Joe Bennett, David Lee and Jason Perlmutter about the history of music in the Upstate, Piedmont and its impact on the world up to the present day. The  conversation will also cover the topic of about out of print and rare vinyl, as well as LPs in the context of analog recording and instruments.

Spartanburg’s own The Antibodies perform songs in between the topics of conversation with The Pulse dancers as well as a set after Lingua Musica concludes at 9pm.

Lingua Musica streams live to the internet and takes live audience comments as well as through online viewers via the website and twitter.

Here’s a bit more info about the folks involved, click on their images to find out more:

The Antibodies and the Pulse Dancers

The Antibodies show is like none other that you’ve seen before with music, dance and visuals — think ‘Pulp Fiction’ meets James Bond,” Showroom Director Stephen Long said in an email to the Herald Journal. The Antibodies consists of vocalist Tom Conder, Kevin Jameson on bass, Lee Holroyd on drums and Mark Branyon on guitar. Their influences are diverse, from The Clash to Ravi Shankar to Hank Williams Sr.

David Lee

David Lee

David Lee was born in Shelby, North Carolina in 1936. In his teenage years, he took up guitar, piano, and poetry. Soon David switched to songwriting and expanded his musical pursuits from there, wearing multiple hats on the local scene while working at the North Lake Country Club in Shelby for several decades. During this time, he launched the Washington Sound record store, founded three record labels–Impel, Washington Sound, and SCOP–and wrote songs and produced a plethora of local talent from R&B, to soul, to African American gospel, country, and pop. His biggest commercial success came in 1971 with his collaboration with Ann Sexton from Greenville, South Carolina. David wrote and produced her debut on Impel, with the great ballad “You’re Letting Me Down,” and it came to the attention of the famous DJ John R. in Nashville who picked it up for reissue on 77 Records. David’s legacy extends much farther than this one 45, as he put out 13 other singles and two albums on his various labels over the years. Paradise of Bachelors Records in Chapel Hill has recently released the first-ever retrospective of his important work, “Said I Had a Vision: Songs & Labels of David Lee, 1960-1988.”

Brendan Greaves, Ann Sexton and Jason PerlmutterIn 2002, while a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jason Perlmutter began collecting local soul recordings from North and South Carolina. On campus, he also served as a disc jockey and station manager at WXYC-FM, the university’s student-run radio station. In 2005, Perlmutter founded the Carolina Soul website, which serves as a living encyclopedia dedicated to the celebration and rediscovery of soul music from the Carolinas. Later he researched and compiled the 2007/2008 Jazzman/Now-Again “Carolina Funk” release, worked on the North Carolina Arts Council African-American Music Trails project, and co-founded the Paradise of Bachelors reissue record label. Over the years he has also disc jockeyed soul music at spots throughout the Carolinas as well as in Virginia, Washington, DC, and New York City.

Paul Riddle

Drummer Paul Riddle was with the Marshall Tucker Band from 1973 – 1983. He was heavily influenced by Buddy Rich and his jazz styling were unique to a rock and roll band and heavily contributed to their unique style of music. He still lives in Spartanburg where he owns a drum stick company, The Carolina Stick Company, and teaches lessons. He occasionally sits in with the Allman Brothers Band and plays in a local band called Throbber.

Joe Bennett
Joe Bennet was the lead guiratist of 1950’s Rock n Roll group based out of Spartanburg, The Sparkletones, whose story should have been a movie. For a lot of listeners, they were and are what rockabilly music was really all about — four kids from the south, none older than 16 and one as young as 13 when they started, getting together and making fast, sometimes raunchy sounds, literally the soundtrack to their own teen years, and having a lot of fun and getting an adventure out of it. Their music at its best sounded as freewheeling as their approach to it really was, and they were rewarded in October of 1957 with a number 17 placement on the Billboard charts for the only record they ever did chart, “Black Slacks.”

Joe Kendrick
Lingua Musica springs from Joe Kendrick‘s love of music and the spoken word, and is the culmination of his work as a radio host and business owner along with his love of journalism and music, its culture and history.

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Show details at a glance:
8pm, $5
828-669-0816
149 S.Daniel Morgan Ave., Suite 2
Spartanburg SC 29306
www.hub-bub.com/showroom
www.linguamusicalive.com
www.twitter.com/linguamusica

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